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Is Southern California’s job rebound ‘too much good stuff’?

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 6:30pm

Two years ago, the initial lockdowns of the pandemic era crushed Southern California’s job market.

But a stunning rebound from those antsy, dark days now raises questions about an economy challenged with “too much good stuff.”

Two springs ago, bosses in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties cast aside 1.27 million workers as government officials and business leaders struggled to figure out how to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

That staff-slashing spree pushed the four-county unemployment rate to a pandemic high of 17.6%, up from 3.9%.

Layoffs and firings soon morphed into renewed hiring. Trillions in economic stimulus were thrown at the national economy to stabilize businesses, then reignite them. Consumers received enormous aid to keep bills paid and food on the table.

And do not forget the business boost from the medical miracle of coronavirus vaccines. These breakthroughs dramatically trimmed the risks of hospitalization or death for COVID-19 patients. Still, 1 million Americans have died.

So two years after record-shattering job losses, April’s employment report from the state’s Employment Development Department details a remarkable recovery.

Southern California’s worker count is just 108,000 short of pre-pandemic employment. Joblessness in the region has fallen to 4.1%.

What’s the beef?

The unprecedented help given to consumers and corporations restored employment and boosted savings accounts and investment values.

Consumers were in a spending mood — and businesses were happy to oblige. All the shopping amid supply chain challenges pushed inflation rates to 40-year highs.

At the latest count, the cost of living soared 10% in a year in the Inland Empire and 8.5% in L.A.-O.C.

Worker shortage

Consider the number of Southern Californians who are officially out of work.

When the virus struck, roughly 1 in 6 local workers lost a job. The official number of the unemployed swiftly grew four-fold.

The rehiring spree has left just 363,000 unemployed as of April 2022 — that’s roughly one-third less than the average number of out-of-work Southern California since 1990.

And you wonder why the average weekly wage for the region is up 15% in the two years ended in September 2021?

Local logistics shops cut 28,000 jobs when the virus hit, but since that low point, 111,000 such jobs have been added �

Shopping spree

Coronavirus changed how we shopped for the goods we need.

A huge winner was the transportation and warehouse industries as online retail grew even faster.

Local logistics shops cut 28,000 jobs when the virus hit, but since that low point, 111,000 such jobs have been added — or roughly four times the virus-linked layoffs.

Early in the pandemic, there were fears shopping centers might become extinct. Southern California’s store owners cut 150,000 jobs as clicking for goods at home became too easy.

But the “death of the mall” thesis was proven wrong. Folks wanted the in-person shopping experience, and brick-and-mortar merchants have now replaced all their pandemic job cuts.

Of course, this leads to a new question — do we now have too many people handling the shopping needs of Southern Californians?

Real worries

Another huge early winner in the pandemic was the property business.

Cheap mortgages and a thirst for larger living spaces drove demand for home purchases, rental units and mortgages.

Starting this year, though, mortgage rates that fell below 3% mid-pandemic have jumped above 5%.

That’s quickly chilled the real estate business.

Bosses in real estate, finance and construction initially cut 76,000 jobs but have refilled 63,000 as the property game heated up. But the sudden real estate chill has cost 4,000 workers their jobs in recent months.

Owners of eateries in Southern California cut 300,000 jobs as pandemic business limitations made operations difficult or impossible. But loosening restrictions and the populace's urge to get out allowed eateries to replace all but 22,000 of those lost jobs. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images/TNS)Owners of eateries in Southern California cut 300,000 jobs as pandemic business limitations made operations difficult or impossible. But loosening restrictions and the populace’s urge to get out allowed eateries to replace all but 22,000 of those lost jobs. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images/TNS) Less fun?

All this spare cash floating in the economy has helped the restaurant business get back to a level near normal.Related Articles

Owners of eateries in Southern California cut 300,000 jobs as pandemic business limitations made operations difficult or impossible. But loosening restrictions and the populace’s urge to get out allowed eateries to replace all but 22,000 of those lost jobs.

The same cannot be said for others peddling the “fun” — the hotel business and the recreation and entertainment industries.

Collectively they cut 160,000 jobs as tourism and gatherings were shuttered. Their reopenings replaced only 120,000 of those positions.

These businesses are still hurt by a lingering reluctance to be in large crowds, especially a slow return to business travel.

Mixed markets

Rehiring is by no means universal as seen through a geographic prism.

The Inland Empire’s job market is the hot spot.

Bosses in Riverside and San Bernardino counties first slashed 220,500 workers, then added 277,000 back — 25% more than the cuts. Unemployment went from 3.9% in February 2020 to a mid-pandemic peak of 15.6% and back to 3.8% in April.

In Orange County, bosses shaved 272,000 workers shortly after the virus struck. Since the bottom, 233,200 jobs have been recovered — or 86% of OC losses. Unemployment went from 2.8% to 15.5% to 2.7%.

L.A. County had 785,000 cuts to start the pandemic era then refilled 659,000 jobs — or 84% of losses. LA unemployment went from 4.3% to 19.20% to 4.7%.

Jonathan Lansner is the business columnist for the Southern California News Group. He can be reached at jlansner@scng.com

Long Beach aquarium exhibition focuses on baby creatures and protecting their habitats

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 5:27pm

The Aquarium of the Pacific is about to go into cuteness overload with a new exhibition celebrating the growing aqua babies at the Long Beach venue.

With the goal of urging the conservation of their environments, the Aquarium opens “Babies!” on May 27, a new exhibition featuring dozens of tiny sea creatures, adorable rescued sea otter pups and even soon-to-be-feared predators who are still in their terrible twos.

But while they’re young and cute, these animals have an important role as part of this exhibition.

“We’re displaying these cute little small animals and fish, but they have a very important story to tell. Through them, we are talking about the habitats they live in and the dangers to these habitats,” said Fahria Qader, director of Pacific Vision and Architecture for the Aquarium.

  • Bamboo sharks are among the young animals that make up...

    Bamboo sharks are among the young animals that make up the Aquarium of the Pacific’s “Babies!” exhibition, which opens May 27. (Photo courtesy Aquarium of the Pacific).

  • A young desert tortoise is among the animals that make...

    A young desert tortoise is among the animals that make up the Aquarium of the Pacific’s “Babies!” exhibition, which opens May 27. (Photo by Robin Riggs).

  • Rescued sea otter pups are among the young animals that...

    Rescued sea otter pups are among the young animals that make up the Aquarium of the Pacific’s “Babies!” exhibition, which opens May 27. (Photo by Robin Riggs).

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Located in the Aquarium’s Pacific Vision gallery, the exhibition is slated to run through next summer and will include color-changing baby cuttlefish, a sea jellyfish nursery lab, a young desert tortoise, baby sharks and other young fish exhibited in habitats like mangroves, coral reefs and seagrass beds.

Among the stars in the exhibition will be four recently rescued sea otters who are all between four-to-eight months old.

“These guys are very, very cute,” Quasar said.

Three of the youngest pups arrived at the Aquarium in January and have yet to be named while Ryder, who at eight months of age is the oldest of the bunch, arrived last fall.

They all still have quite a lot of growing to do since sea otters can live up to 22 years in captivity.

And while she’s not a sea creature, Sally, the juvenile desert tortoise, lives at the aquarium and is still a baby. Sally is estimated to be between 5-10 years old, which for a tortoise is still a baby since desert tortoises can live to around 80 years.

And cue the Baby Shark song because a group of bamboo and Epaulette sharks will be swimming around their nursery. They’re about two years old now but can live up to 25 years. Besides baby sharks, visitors will also see shark eggs, Qader said.

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But all babies have to grow up at some point, so the exhibition will evolve as well.

“Because these are small little babies they can’t stay babies forever, so we’ll have to change them out and put new species in. So this is a good exhibit to come and see a few times because you will have new animals in there,” Qader said.

Aquarium of the Pacific

When: Aquarium hours are 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. The exhibition runs from March 15-May 31.

Where: Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach.

Admission: $36.95 for adults, $33.95 for seniors 62 years of age and older, $26.95 for kids 3-11 and free for children under age three.

Information: 562-590-3100, aquariumofpacific.org

Why this hardy, low-water groundcover might be your green grass alternative

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 4:43pm

With increasingly strict water rationing in most of our immediate futures, there is a lawn alternative that requires irrigation no more than once a week and can make do with even less. This alternative to green grass is miniclover, also known as micro clover. I learned about miniclover from a company in Oregon known as Outsidepride Seed Source (outsidepride.com) that specializes in the production of miniclover seed, selling to the general public.

Dutch or white clover is probably familiar to you. It has unmistakable white gumdrop flowers and deep green, trifoliate leaves known as shamrocks, with each leaflet bearing a white chevron. Often, in a rather yellow lawn, you will see outcroppings of lush clover. The reason for the dark green color of the clover is its identity as a legume, which means that it manufactures its own nitrate fertilizer through symbiosis with a bacteria that dwells in the nodules of its roots. Thus, lots of clover in a yellow lawn is an indication of nitrogen deficiency in the lawn grass since the only plant that prospers is clover, which does not need supplemental fertilizer to flourish.

  • Western redbud Cercis occidentalis. (Photo by Joshua Siskin)

    Western redbud Cercis occidentalis. (Photo by Joshua Siskin)

  • Staghorn ferns irrigated by spaghetti tubing. (Photo by Joshua Siskin)

    Staghorn ferns irrigated by spaghetti tubing. (Photo by Joshua Siskin)

  • Miniclover. (Photo courtesy of Outsidepride.com)

    Miniclover. (Photo courtesy of Outsidepride.com)

  • Peruvian lily Alstroemeria peruviana var. Third Harmonic. (Photo by Joshua...

    Peruvian lily Alstroemeria peruviana var. Third Harmonic. (Photo by Joshua Siskin)

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Until the 1950s, white clover was considered a staple in lawn seed mixtures because of its ability to crowd out weeds and establish in poor soils. The development and application of broadleaf herbicides, however, killed clover along with dandelions and other leafy weeds so that, soon enough, the appearance of clover was considered undesirable. Thus, a previously friendly lawn constituent suddenly achieved the dubious status of a weed.

Dandelions, incidentally, are among the most nutritious greens you can grow, with an extremely high concentration of vitamins that render them more nutritious than even spinach or kale. The problem with dandelions is that they will quickly take over your lawn. Moreover, unlike dandelions, clover gives you a lush green look, inviting you to walk barefoot over it or to simply flex your toes in its soft, cool expanse.

Enter miniclover. Miniclover is the same species as conventional white clover (Trifolium repens), except its leaves are half the size. Like the conventional type, it is recommended for toughening up a lawn since it quickly germinates to fill in bare spots but may also be used to overseed a lush, but perpetually thirsty or weedy, lawn. When you overseed a water-guzzling grass such as tall fescue (Marathon) with white clover, you impart drought tolerance due to the greater depth of clover roots, reduce the need for fertilizer and inhibit the growth of weeds, which are crowded out by the rampantly growing clover. In the manner of Bermuda grass and strawberries, clover propagates itself vegetatively by stolons or runners.

The advantage of miniclover over conventional white clover is the more aesthetic look of its smaller leaves and its denser habit of growth. This density is especially significant should you decide to plant it from scratch as a lawn alternative since it will impart greater drought tolerance and stifle growth of weeds more comprehensively than when it is overseeded on an existing lawn.

Another miniclover advantage is that it flowers far less than conventional white clover. Clover flowers are a powerful magnet to bees and if you have small children who want to play in it, or if you want to walk barefoot in it, the fewer flowers the better. Moreover, if you mow your miniclover every now and then, you will not see any flowers at all. When planted as a monoculture with monthly mowing, miniclover becomes a tight-knit sward of green. You can mow it to a height of two inches and you don’t need to bag what is cut since the trimmings will quickly decompose in place. By the same token, if you wish to just let miniclover grow and never mow it, that’s okay too; unmowed, it will eventually reach four to six inches in height. It is also noteworthy that while lawn grasses are killed by dog urine, clover is not affected by it.

On the other hand, if you decide to grow clover for its toughness and pollinator status, and do not plan to walk barefoot or play on it, you may wish to allow your clover to flower freely. Clover flowers, in fact, are as bee friendly as any other flowers (think clover honey) and they attract beneficial insects, too, especially miniscule parasitic wasps. These amazing creatures lay their eggs inside aphids, whiteflies, and scales; after parasitic wasp larvae hatch out, they cannibalize their insect hosts.

If your existing lawn is somewhat tired, weedy, or showing dead spots, you may still wish to just overseed it with miniclover as opposed to starting a miniclover lawn from scratch. The reason for this is that grass is more tolerant of food traffic than clover. In fact, if you decide to seed a new lawn on bare soil, you may wish to consider a mix of tall fescue, perennial rye, and miniclover, since combining them will result in your benefiting from the advantages of each. If you go with a seed mix, clover seed should constitute 10%-15% of it to make sure it has a foothold sufficient to reduce watering, fertilization, weeds, and dog damage. If the mix contains more than this proportion of clover seed, it may overtake and eventually kill the grasses.

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If you wish to overseed an exisiting lawn with miniclover, you will need one pound of miniclover seed per thousand square feet of lawn, and a miniclover monoculture as a lawn replacement will require two pounds per thousand square feet of area. A pound of miniclover seeds costs around $20 dollars. Like other small seeds, those of miniclover will spread more uniformly when mixed with sand, good garden soil, or finished compost. It is best to plant miniclover in spring or fall because it germinates better when the weather is somewhat cool so if you plant it now you will have to be attentive to its water needs on a daily basis until it is growing vigorously.

Send questions, comments, and photos to joshua@perfectplants.com

Garcetti’s parents hire lobbyist to push for his ambassadorship

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 4:30pm

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti’s nomination as an ambassador to India has stalled because of fallout from allegations, which he has denied, that he ignored sexual misconduct by a top staffer — but it appears his parents are now trying to help.

The firm McGuireWoods Consulting registered with the federal government this week on behalf of Sukey and Gil Garcetti to lobby on the issue of “Outreach Related to Confirmation for Ambassadorship Nomination.”

The effective date for the lobbying registration was April 5.

The mayor’s parents, former LA County District Attorney Gil and Sukey Garcetti, attended their son’s December confirmation hearing before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

President Joe Biden nominated Garcetti in July to become U.S. ambassador to India, but the mayor’s Senate confirmation has been uncertain following accusations, led by a former Garcetti aide, that LA’s top elected leader knew about allegations of sexual assault and harassment made against his former senior adviser, Rick Jacobs.

A probe sought by Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, recently found it “extremely unlikely” that Garcetti was unaware of Jacobs’ behavior, and reported that by “all accounts,” Garcetti is closely involved in “the day-to-day operation of his office.”

The Grassley-initiated  investigation concluded that it was “more probable than not” that Jacobs “sexually harassed multiple individuals and made racist comments towards others.”

Garcetti and his office have repeatedly denied the accusation and have pointed to other probes that cleared the mayor of wrongdoing.

Sukey and Gil Garcetti hired McGuireWoods to lobby on their behalf for the purpose of “outreach related to confirmation for ambassadorship nomination,” Politico reported Friday, May 20.

The lobbyists assigned to that account are Ryan Bernstein, the former chief of staff to Sen. John Hoeven, R-North Dakota, and Breelyn Pete, Garcetti’s former deputy mayor and advisor, according to Politico.

A statement from the mayor was not immediately available.

But he did respond in a statement after the Senate report came out on May 10.

“While I strongly disagree with the opinion reached in this report,” Garcetti said at the time, “I am pleased that Senator Grassley has lifted his hold, and hope that my nomination by the president can be considered by the Senate soon.”

Garcetti’s father was Los Angeles County’s district attorney from 1992 to 2000.

SCNG staff write Elizabeth Chou contributed to this report.

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How California bureaucrats are using a typo to destroy a fisherman’s dream

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 4:00pm

Bureaucrats sometimes make mistakes. But when they refuse to acknowledge a mistake and double down on it to deprive someone of their livelihood and family business, a lawsuit can be the only way to hold them accountable. That’s what happened to Max Williams, and he’s fighting back.

Max has dreamed of captaining his own fishing vessel since he was young. Fishing has been the Williams family’s way of life for decades. They have owned and operated vessels practicing sustainable fishing off the coast of California to feed their community and provide for their family. Like his grandfather and parents before him, Max wants to continue the family tradition and captain his own boat.

California law requires Max to obtain a “gillnet” permit from the government before he can legally fish as a vessel operator.

Max toiled as a crewman on his family’s vessels for years. During that time, he became an experienced fisherman and learned the ins and outs of the industry. The logical next step for Max is to become a vessel owner and operator. To do that, he invested nearly every penny he earned as a crewman to buy, restore, and equip his own boat.

But the California Department of Fish and Wildlife has denied Max a gill-net fishing permit that will allow him to operate his own fishing vessel. And the rules by which it claims to do so will eventually close a vital fishery that thousands of people in California depend on to earn a living.

How did this happen?

The Legislature limited the number of permits in 1985 for the sensible purpose of avoiding overfishing and other risks to fisheries. But that law allows a fisherman to obtain an existing permit by transfer from another fisherman if both meet specific qualifications. This “transfer system” leaves a path for future generations of fishermen to continue in the profession.

Luckily, Max found a fellow fisherman who is qualified and willing to transfer his permit. But the Department denied Max’s permit transfer request. They say he doesn’t meet all five regulatory requirements for eligibility, which show he has experience in the industry and as a crewmember on boats using gill nets.

The problem with the Department’s argument is that it’s based on a scrivener’s error — the legal term for what amounts to a typo — that occurred decades ago when the legislature’s requirements were translated into regulation. A bureaucrat accidentally removed an “or” between the qualification requirements. The Department claims that this means that applicants must meet all five requirements rather than any one of them, as the regulation stated when it was first issued.

The legislature’s clear intent was to allow someone like Max to get a transferred permit if he met any, not all, of the statutory requirements.

Under the Department’s newfound view, applicants are in a Catch-22: they must either already have a permit or have qualifications that can only be obtained if the fisherman already has a permit. Their blundering interpretation of the law would be comedic were it not destroying Max’s professional dreams. Adding insult to injury, the Department didn’t interpret its regulations this way for the past 30 years — had Max applied earlier before the agency doubled down on its error, he would be captaining his own fishing boat today.

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Represented by Pacific Legal Foundation, Max has sued to require the Department to issue his transfer permit request. The Department’s denial of his permit defies the law that aimed to allow fishermen to transfer old permits to the younger generation pursuing their calling at sea. The right to earn a living is one of Americans’ most important rights. It shouldn’t be taken away by bureaucrats claiming powers the legislature never gave them — let alone based on a typo.

Yes, bureaucrats make mistakes. But courts must step in and hold the government accountable when those mistakes are exploited to change the law without legislative approval.

Frank Garrison and Paige Gilliard are attorneys at Pacific Legal Foundation, a nonprofit legal organization that defends Americans’ liberties when threatened by government overreach and abuse.

Religion events in the San Fernando Valley area, May 21-28

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 3:00pm

 

Ash Wednesday observance on March 2 at North Hollywood First United Methodist Church on Tujunga Avenue. (Google Street View)North Hollywood First United Methodist Church on Tujunga Avenue. (Google Street View)

 

Here is a sampling of upcoming faith gatherings in the San Fernando Valley area.

 

May 21

 

Sherman Oaks Lutheran Church: The church holds a contemporary service at 5 p.m. Also, a traditional/blended service, 10 a.m. on Sunday. Rev. Titus Utecht is the pastor. The church’s May newsletter, the Oakleaves: bit.ly/3w9vJ8q. The church is located at 14847 Dickens St. 818-789-0215. www.facebook.com/ShermanOaksLutheran. shermanoakslutheran.org

 

May  22

 

Sixth Sunday of Easter at Prince of Peace Episcopal Church: Two services, 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Location, 5700 Rudnick Ave., Woodland Hills. 818-346-6968. www.popwh.org. www.facebook.com/POPWH. Details and bulletin for the Sunday service: bit.ly/3PwTdfe

Good Belongs to All: The Rev. Michael McMorrow delivers the message at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. The center’s May theme is “Joy.” In addition, the Rev. Michael McMorrow often gives a “Mid-Day Reset,” around noon Monday-Friday on the center’s Facebook (www.facebook.com/csl.granadahills). Center for Spiritual Living-Granada Hills, 17622 Chatsworth St., Granada Hills. 818-363-8136. Check the center’s Facebook page here for this Sunday’s updates: conta.cc/384osgS

Unity in Diversity: The Rev. Jim Sillerud explains the message, based on Ephesians 4:1-6, 9 and 11 a.m. Details on the church and upcoming events on the May newsletter, “The Spire,” bit.ly/3M5jmjj. First Presbyterian Church of Granada Hills, 10400 Zelzah Ave., Northridge. 818-360-1831. www.fpcgh.org

First Trouble…Then Peace – Sixth Sunday of Easter: Pastor Timothy Jenks explains the message, based on John 16:23-33, at 9:30 a.m. Sermons also available to watch on the church’s Facebook and website. Canoga Park Lutheran Church, 7357 Jordan Ave. 818-348-5714. www.facebook.com/canoga.park.lutheran.church; www.cplchurch.org

Sixth Sunday in Easter at St. Luke Lutheran Church: The Rev. Janet Hansted delivers the message, 9:30 a.m. Check the website for the Sunday bulletin tab (www.stlukelutheran.com/events-1) and also the newsletter. Location, 5312 Comercio Way, Woodland Hills. 818-346-3070. www.stlukelutheran.com

Protecting God’s Family: The Rev. Joseph Choi delivers the message, based on 1 Corinthians 5:6-13, at 10 a.m. (English language) and at 11:30 a.m. (Korean language). The church’s newsletter for May: bit.ly/3rXRTIc. Northridge United Methodist Church, 9650 Reseda Blvd. 818-886-1555. www.facebook.com/northridgeumc. www.northridgeumc.org

The Purpose of the Public School: The Rev. Bill Freeman discusses the topic online at 10 a.m. Find the Zoom link on the website. 616-796-5598. church-ish.org

The House of Love – Sixth Sunday of Easter: The Rev. Steve Peralta delivers the message, part of a sermon series “Get Out of the Way” and based on John 14:23-29, at 10:30 a.m. First United Methodist Church, 4832 Tujunga Ave., North Hollywood. 818-763-8231. Church updates: www.facebook.com/nohofumc1. Details: conta.cc/3PwkChn

Spiritual Hugs: Sabbatical Minister explains the message, with worship associate Melissa Marote, 10:30 a.m. To watch online, use the link from the website or here: live.emersonuuc.org. By phone: 669-900-6833 and use ID: 8581092800 and use Password: chalice. Emerson Unitarian Universalist Church, 7304 Jordan Ave., Canoga Park. Voice mail, 818-887-6101. www.emersonuuc.org/

The Eye of the Storm: The Rev. Stephen Rambo explains the message, 10:30 a.m. Also available to watch on Facebook here: bit.ly/3ww8vrW. Center for Spiritual Living-Simi Valley, 1756 Erringer Road. 805-527-0870. www.facebook.com/cslsimi; www.cslsimi.org

I Embrace Change Gracefully: Liz Raci gives her thoughts on Unity Burbank – Center for Spiritual Awareness’s May theme, 11 a.m. The theme for May is based on Ecclesiastes 3:1. Background on Unity, founded in the 1880s, here: www.unity.org. Unity Burbank, 637 S. Victory Blvd., Burbank. 818-841-4037. Facebook: www.facebook.com/unityburbank. Details on the church and services in the “Words of Light” newsletter: bit.ly/386i4FG

Interfaith Solidarity March Los Angeles: Join the 7th annual walk, with this year’s theme “Freedom, Diversity and Respect: Learning to Live Together,” 1-5 p.m. Registration check-in; 1 p.m. program, 1:30 p.m.; walk begins, 2 p.m. Begin: St. Basil’s Roman Catholic Church, 3611 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles; two brief stops and ends at Islamic Center of Southern California, 434 Vermont Ave., Los Angeles. Register here: www.eventbrite.com/e/interfaith-solidarity-march-la-2022-tickets-204828275887

 

May 27

 

Shabbat with Temple Judea: 6:15 p.m. Watch on Facebook through the link on the website. 5429 Lindley Ave., Tarzana. 818-758-3800. Details here: bit.ly/3u20TvJ

Shabbat with Temple Beth Emet: Rabbi Mark H. Sobel leads the service, 7 p.m. The Reform congregation’s May newsletter, “Chai Times” here: bit.ly/3l2Xn0a. 600 N. Buena Vista St., Burbank. 818-843-4787. www.templebethemet.com

 

Send information at least two weeks ahead. holly.andres@dailynews.com. 818-713-3708.

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Remove obstacles to creating affordable housing in underutilized commercial spaces

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 3:00pm

While California continues to struggle with a growing housing shortage, cities across the state have an untapped resource that could be providing hundreds of affordable units for both low and moderate-income Californians: underutilized and vacant commercial spaces.

More than 25% of the 191,000 acres of commercially-zoned land in greater Los Angeles is currently vacant. Many of these commercially-zoned parcels are ideal locations for affordable housing in areas near public transit, jobs, and services. Elected officials simply need to remove obstacles to getting critically needed housing built where space is readily available and it makes the most sense.

The need to build exponentially more housing in the LA region and across the state is undeniable. California’s 2022 Statewide Housing Plan estimates that we need to build approximately 2.5 million units of housing over the next eight years to overcome our housing shortage, including over one million units affordable to lower-income households. Los Angeles County alone requires more than 800,000 new units before 2030 in order to meet demand. We are nowhere close to meeting that goal and inaction will mean more Angelenos will struggle to pay skyrocketing rent, more families priced out of homeownership, and the homelessness crisis will worsen.

While California’s housing crisis has been difficult for many, the impact has not been felt equally–communities of color have been disproportionately hurt by the lack of affordable housing. Nearly two-thirds of Black households in the state pay more than 30% of their income on housing, compared to under half of white households, and households of color were more likely to miss a rent payment during the pandemic. While Black Angelos make up only 8% of the population, they represent 34% of people experiencing homelessness in LA County.

This month, California Assembly Members will vote on AB 2011, a bill that will make it faster and easier to build affordable and mixed-income housing projects in underutilized commercial areas if they meet objective planning and zoning code standards as well as specific affordability, labor, and environmental criteria. Housing that is 100% affordable to lower-income households will be allowed anywhere in infill areas currently zoned for office, retail, and parking use as long as they are not adjacent to industrial or environmentally sensitive land. Mixed income housing will be eligible if it is focused along commercial corridors that are wide enough to accommodate density and new transit and include 15% affordable units.

And because the new housing would occur only in infill areas zoned for commercial use, this policy will add thousands of units of affordable housing to the market without impacting or increasing density in existing residential neighborhoods.

AB 2011 will also require that this housing development is paired with a range of responsible wage and training standards– enabling us to build affordable and market rate housing while supporting valuable construction jobs that guarantee high wages and health care benefits.

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Policies such as these, that support affordable housing development and a thriving, well-paid, middle-class construction workforce, can make a lifetime–even generations–of difference for low-income and communities of color, allowing them to provide for their families and save for the future.

The COVID-19 pandemic escalated our state’s extreme housing affordability and homelessness crisis, but it also inspired leaders and communities across the state to think creatively about how to protect Californian’s who are struggling to make ends meet. AB 2011 reflects a similar willingness to use new approaches to address seemingly entrenched problems.

By making it easier to convert thousands of square feet of vacant and underutilized commercial land into desperately needed lower-cost housing, state legislators can demonstrate they are committed to making California more affordable for all.

Roberto Barragan is executive director of the California Community Economic Development Association (CCEDA). CCEDA comprises organizations actively engaged in revitalizing California’s neighborhoods, including resident-driven community development corporations, local governments, community action agencies, and faith-based institutions.

CSUN celebrates graduates — including those from 2019-2021 who missed out because of the pandemic

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 3:00pm

California State Northridge held its commencement ceremonies on Fridyy, May 20, for graduates from the classes of fall 2019 to summer 2021 who wanted to take part in an in-person fete.

Those classes had to have either virtual or hybrid graduations because of the coronavirus pandemic, so they received special ceremonies on the campus Friday.

Those who graduated from the Mike Curb College of Arts, Media, and Communication; David Nazarian College of Business and Economics; College of Humanities; and College of Health and Human Developmentduring those pandemic years were honored at 8 a.m. on the University Library lawn.

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall...

    Commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Friends and family cheer during commencement ceremonies for Cal State...

    Friends and family cheer during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • CSUN President Erika D. Beck speaks duing commencement ceremonies for...

    CSUN President Erika D. Beck speaks duing commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge...

    Decorative mortarboards during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes...

    Graduates during commencement ceremonies for Cal State University Northridge classes of fall 2019/spring 2020 and fall 2020/spring 2021 on the CSUN campus Friday, May 20, 2022. The ceremonies were held for students that did not have a commencement due to the pandemic.(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

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The second ceremony, at 1 p.m. and also on the lawn in the center of the CSUN campus, was for graduates from the Michael D. Eisner College of Education; College of Engineering and Computer Science; College of Science and Mathematics; and College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

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CSUN also kicked off its commencement ceremonies for 2022 graduates at 6 p.m. Friday by honoring students in the colleges of Engineering & Computer Science, and Science & Mathematics. The ceremonies for the rest of the 2022 graduates, depending on their colleges, will be held from Saturday to Monday, May 21-23. The class size for 2021-22 is 11,681 for both undergraduates and graduates.

All of the CSUN 2022 ceremonies are available to watch on the university’s Facebook page or YouTube channel.

Before joining that nonprofit board, ask these questions first

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 2:40pm

Several years ago, I was asked to join a board for a local nonprofit. Because I knew and respected many of the board members and believed in the organization, I did not spend much time on my personal due diligence efforts before committing to serve.

The board members and executive director were upstanding citizens, well-liked within the community and many were my friends.

As a new board member, I looked forward to the scheduled meetings partially to catch up with the other members.

Within a few months, I realized that I was in for more than I had anticipated. The board members were easy to work with and agreeable to the action items presented at the monthly meetings. In retrospect, maybe too accepting.

In the same period, I also discovered that one of the senior paid staff members was not easy to work with. This person agreed to complete all requests the board members made for supporting data but rarely fulfilled the action items to present the data at the following board meeting.

There was always a reason the task was not completed, and someone else was always at fault. Additionally, the documents presented were not consistent month to month and the data was incomplete, incorrect, or absent from the meetings.

Eventually, we learned that, behind the scenes, the senior staff member was berating and intimidating the support staff. We later learned that several staff members were afraid to speak up when asked to at the board meetings. By browbeating the staff, the senior staff member was able to control the outcome.

Unfortunately for this person, the board members soon realized something could be wrong. They started to ask deeper questions and made a request to review bank and credit card statements. This ended with the unpleasant discovery that the senior employee was embezzling from the organization.

Before committing to nonprofit board service, familiarize yourself with the culture, governance and finances. Take some time to do your research and ask questions about the organization.

Before you agree to serve, consider the following:

Due diligence

Even if you are willing, never commit to serve on a board without spending some time researching the organization. Don’t assume because you are personal friends with board members that the organization is well-managed. Often board members don’t ask questions, especially when it comes to finances.

Review the bylaws, current financial statements, and recent board meeting minutes, and attend a meeting or two as an observer before joining the board. Are the meetings run professionally? Do the board members seem engaged? Are they asking good questions? Are the financial statements current?

If you are interested in joining the board after observing how the meetings are managed and the data presented, then ask the following:

–Does the board host an annual board orientation to which new and returning board members are invited?

–Is there a history of board minutes documenting communications to the board to keep the governing body apprised of programs, major contractual agreements, staffing changes, threatened or ongoing litigation, and finances?

–Is there an employee handbook and other written employment policies?

–Are there any prior or pending lawsuits?

— Does the organization have the appropriate annual audit reports?

— Is the board apprised of the steps in place to protect the nonprofit and its governing team?

— How are board members held accountable for their commitments?

— Are members of the board educated on their responsibility to disclose actual and potential conflicts of interest? Is there a written conflict of interest policy?

Is the organization insured?

What risk management practices do the organization have to prevent or minimize exposure to litigation? The organization should carry general liability coverage, professional liability coverage and directors’ and officers’ liability insurance.

Sometimes a board will carry general liability and professional liability insurance but will not purchase directors’ and officers’ insurance. If you plan on serving on a nonprofit board, always ask if a current D&O policy is in place. Remember: You have personal exposure when serving as a board member. Directors’ and officers’ insurance helps mitigate your personal risk.

Can you commit?

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Never agree to serve as a board member without asking questions first. Do you believe in the cause the organization supports? Are you willing to put your personal interests aside when voting on the issues presented to the board? Do you have the time and resources to support the mission of the nonprofit? Are you prepared to donate to the organization, seek sponsors, and fundraise?

Additionally, before accepting the opportunity, make sure you are serving for the right reasons. And if you do not have the time or desire to commit — or you question the integrity of the organization — respectfully decline the invitation to serve.

Nonprofit executive directors have many varied daily responsibilities. In addition to managing their staff, they handle finances, engage donors, and serve those in need. Their focus is on implementing the organization’s mission, so they may not have time to give due attention to managing the risk to which board members are exposed.

Make sure that you have the time, commitment to the cause, and adequate protection against risk so that your focus can be placed on helping to fulfill the mission of the organization.  Then, it’s a win-win for everyone.

Teri Parker is a vice president for CAPTRUST Financial Advisors. She has practiced in the field of financial planning and investment management since 2000. Reach her via email at Teri.parker@captrustadvisors.com

Australia Election Live Updates: Awaiting a Result From a Close Race

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 1:12pm
With polls now closed, early returns indicated an uncertain outcome. During the campaign, Australians voiced concern about inflation and climate change, but the race turned into more of a personality contest.

In South Korea, Biden Moves to Shore Up Alliance

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 12:17pm
President Biden said he would consider expanding joint military exercises that were scaled back during the Trump administration.

Vacation Reading, Unpacked

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 11:19am
What do we want from the books we take with us when we travel? They can be a destination, a guide — or the tether that restores us to ourselves.

Baz Luhrmann Talks ‘Elvis’ With Maureen Dowd

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 11:00am
In other words, yes, the director has made a movie about Elvis.

Bush Dynasty, Its Influence Fading, Pins Hopes on One Last Stand in Texas

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 11:00am
George P. Bush is running to unseat the incumbent attorney general. His family, once powerful in Texas, has become an albatross as well as an asset.

Summer Reading BSuggestions

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 11:00am
A book for “White Lotus” fans, a coming-of-age story in the Canary Islands, Werner Herzog’s debut novel (yes, it’s grim) and more.

Writers to Watch This Summer

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 11:00am
Three authors discuss their new novels and what brought them to write about a young woman in trouble, three brothers from Staten Island and an anxious parrot.

Long Covid Symptoms and Treatment: What We Know So Far

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 11:00am
There is no universal definition of the complex condition, but clues about causes and potential treatments are beginning to emerge.

Judge Approves N.Y. House Map, Cementing Chaos for Democrats

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 9:01am
The new district lines, approved late Friday night, will create pickup opportunities for Republicans and force Democratic incumbents to run against each other.

JSerra baseball reigns in CIF-SS Division 1 with win over Notre Dame

Daily News - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 8:26am

FULLERTON – JSerra has fielded some excellent baseball teams over the past dozen years.

League champions, top-ranked teams and teams that went deep into the playoffs with talented rosters. The Lions played in a CIF Southern Section championship game for the first time last season and lost to Harvard-Westlake in the Division 1 final.

“And this,” JSerra coach Brett Kay said, “is probably the one team you didn’t think was going to win it.”

This was the team that did.

JSerra won its first CIF-SS baseball championship Friday with a 3-1 win over Notre Dame of Sherman Oaks in the Division 1 final at Cal State Fullerton.

  • JSerra players celebrate after defeating Notre Dame in the CIF-SS...

    JSerra players celebrate after defeating Notre Dame in the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra dugout greets David Horn after he hit a sacrifice...

    JSerra dugout greets David Horn after he hit a sacrifice fly during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Owen Fuller gestures as he runs to score during...

    JSerra’s Owen Fuller gestures as he runs to score during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Tyler Gough reacts after getting out of an inning...

    JSerra’s Tyler Gough reacts after getting out of an inning during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra team pose for a photo after defeating Notre Dame...

    JSerra team pose for a photo after defeating Notre Dame in the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Lou Fujiwara slides to catch a fly ball in...

    JSerra’s Lou Fujiwara slides to catch a fly ball in foul territory during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • Notre Dame’s Christian Miranda turns a double play over the...

    Notre Dame’s Christian Miranda turns a double play over the slide by JSerra’s Owen Fuller during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • Notre Dame’s Cole Clark throws a pitch during the CIF-SS...

    Notre Dame’s Cole Clark throws a pitch during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against JSerra at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Tyler Gough reacts after striking out to defeat Notre...

    JSerra’s Tyler Gough reacts after striking out to defeat Notre Dame in the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Jonathan Mendez slides home to score during the CIF-SS...

    JSerra’s Jonathan Mendez slides home to score during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Owen Fuller, bottom, celebrates his triple during the CIF-SS...

    JSerra’s Owen Fuller, bottom, celebrates his triple during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s JJ Hollis throws a pitch during the CIF-SS Division...

    JSerra’s JJ Hollis throws a pitch during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Andrew Lamb hits a triple during the CIF-SS Division...

    JSerra’s Andrew Lamb hits a triple during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Andrew Lamb reacts on his triple during the CIF-SS...

    JSerra’s Andrew Lamb reacts on his triple during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • Notre Dame’s Cole Clark reacts after the team turns a...

    Notre Dame’s Cole Clark reacts after the team turns a double play during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against JSerra at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s David Horn hits a sacrifice fly during the CIF-SS...

    JSerra’s David Horn hits a sacrifice fly during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

  • JSerra’s Tyler Gough throws a pitch during the CIF-SS Division...

    JSerra’s Tyler Gough throws a pitch during the CIF-SS Division 1 championship game against Notre Dame at Goodwin Field in Fullerton on Friday, May 20, 2022. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)

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At one point, the Lions were 6-9 in March and lost six of their first seven Trinity League games. They became one of the hotter teams in Southern California late in the regular season and it carried over into the playoffs.

The Lions (23-10) won Friday night by scoring twice in the bottom of the sixth to break a 1-1 tie.

With one out JSerra senior second baseman Owen Fuller hit a sky-scraping fly to deep center field. Notre Dame center fielder Dean West made a great effort to chase it down but could not get to it, and Fuller made the turn at second base with intentions.

“I looked up, got the signal (from third-base coach Matt Orloff) and kept going,” Fuller said.

Jonathan Mendez followed with a walk. With the Notre Dame infield drawn in, JSerra’s Dominic Smaldino slapped the ball to the right of second base to drive in Fuller for a 2-1 lead. Mendez, who went to third on the Smaldino hit, scored on David Horn’s sacrifice fly to make it 3-1.

Tyler Gough, who entered the game in the fifth inning to replace JSerra starting pitcher JJ Hollis, struck out three in a row in the seventh inning to seal the win.

Hollis pitched 4 2/3 scoreless innings and gave up three hits.

The season continues for both teams in the CIF SoCal Regional playoffs that begin May 31. Brackets will be released May 29. JSerra won the SoCal Division 1 Regional championship last season.

Notre Dame (24-8-1) tied the score in the top of the sixth inning. Brandon Gonzaga and Jack Gurevitch opened the inning with back-to-back walks. Knights pinch-hitter Adrian Shlesinger bunted, JSerra catcher Brandon Chang’s throw was just wide of the mark and got past first-baseman Smaldino to enable Gonzaga to score.

One strikeout later, Notre Dame’s Ryan Limerick hit a ground ball to shortstop Mendez, who threw to Chang for the second out. Gough, throwing with impressive velocity, ended the inning with a strikeout, his fifth of the 11 batters he faced.

Chang made an outstanding play in the top of the second inning. Notre Dame’s Madden Ocko led off with a single and advanced to second base on a balk. Anthony Revalas hit a line drive to that JSerra center fielder Jack Bourne picked up on the hop, gunned the ball to home where Change gathered it a couple of feet in front of the plate, reached behind him and tagged the back of Ocko’s right foot for the third out.

JSerra took a 1-0 lead in the bottom of the third. Chang walked on a 3-2 count, went to second base on Bourne’s sacrifice bunt and scored on Lamb’s triple to center field.

Horn, a senior, said it was satisfying to get Kay the first CIF-SS championship in the 16th season of Kay’s coaching tenure at JSerra.

“It means the world,” Horn said. “That was one of the biggest motivators for us as a team and for me personally and the seniors, to see the time and effort he puts into our team and the players individually. It’s special.”

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And it was special for Horn to be on the first JSerra team to get a CIF-SS title, given the Lions’ long list of outstanding players who have gone on to college and professional baseball success.

“Guys like (MLB players) Royce Lewis and Austin Hedges, and our team last year,” Horn said. “And the fact we had this group of guys that were down so early, people counted us out. It just shows the kind of fight we had in us.”

C.D.C Says Adults 50 and Over Should Get Second Booster Shot

NY Times - Sab, 21/05/2022 - 7:54am
Previously, the agency said those 50 and older could opt for the additional shot, but encouraged only people over 65 or with underlying medical conditions to get it.