Stati Uniti d'America

Sri Lanka Bombings Injure Scores at Churches and Hotels

NY Times - 1 ora 20 min fa
At least 50 people have been injured, officials said. It was not immediately clear who was responsible for the attacks.

Angels allow 4 homers to Mariners and drop 6th straight game

Daily News - 1 ora 40 min fa

ANAHEIM — The Angels’ miserable week continued, with another game of uncharacteristic homers allowed by Trevor Cahill and an offense that came up one big hit short.

The Angels lost their sixth straight game on Saturday night, falling 6-5 to the Seattle Mariners.

Cahill gave up three of the four homers the Mariners hit, putting the Angels in a hole they could not escape, no matter how many opportunities they had.

The Angels had 13 hits and three walks, but they were 2 for 11 with runners in scoring position, and left 10 runners on base.

The uphill climb began immediately, when Cahill gave up a homer to Mitch Haniger leading off the game. He gave up another to Daniel Vogelbach in the first, and then a booming 432-foot homer to Edwin Encarnacion in the fifth.

A ground ball pitcher throughout his career, Cahill had allowed three homers in a game just four times in the first 212 starts of his career. The last time was in September 2017.

Coming into the game, Cahill had a career average of 0.9 homers per nine innings. This season he has allowed eight homers in 26-1/3 innings, a ratio of 2.7 per nine innings.

Cahill also had trouble putting hitters away, with Haniger’s homer and a two-run single by Dee Gordon coming on 0-and-2 pitches.

While the Angels couldn’t slow down the Mariners at the plate, they did at least keep the game interesting by putting constant pressure on Mariners lefty Yusei Kikuchi.

The Angels have not hit lefties well this season, but they scored four runs on 10 hits in five innings in their first look at the Mariners prized free agent from Japan.

Andrelton Simmons had three of the hits, running his torrid stretch to 12 for 25.

Simmons scored the Angels’ first run when he came home from first on Albert Pujols’ third-inning double down the left field line.

It was the 1,992nd RBI of Pujols’ career, which equaled Babe Ruth for fifth on the all-time list, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. Ruth actually has been credited with 2,214, but many of those came before RBIs were recognized as an official statistic in 1920.

Pujols later picked up another RBI with a solo homer in the ninth, which cut the Angels’ deficit to 6-5.

They had been chasing the Mariners all night, never able to get the game tied.

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Down 5-2 in the fifth, they got a run when Simmons doubled and scored on a Jonathan Lucroy single. They got another when Brian Goodwin tripled, driving in Kevan Smith.

It was Goodwin’s second hit of the night against a lefty, as he pushes to get more playing time against lefties.

So far this season, Peter Bourjos has started against most lefties, but he’s now hitting .103. Although Bourjos had a single, he also popped out with runners at the corners and no outs in the fourth, left the potential tying run on in the fifth and struck out to leave the bases loaded in the seventh.

More to come on this story.

Kartje: New leagues hope to pave alternative path for young NFL prospects

Daily News - 1 ora 46 min fa

At the end of November of 1925, after three years spent dominating college football at the University of Illinois, Red Grange signed a contract with the Chicago Bears. It was decision without precedent in football’s brief history.

For the fledgling NFL, which still lagged behind the college game in terms of popularity, it was a significant step towards legitimizing the league. For the star players that followed Grange, his signing – and the 67-day barnstorming tour that accompanied it – laid the groundwork for future college football players to jump to the NFL. The draft was born a decade after that, defining that path even further.

Almost a full century later, the primary path to pro football remains largely unchanged and unchallenged, even as both college football and the NFL have become billion-dollar cultural behemoths. Star players still must spend at least three seasons removed from high school graduation, per the NFL’s collectively bargained eligibility rules. During those three years, while playing as unpaid amateurs on a massive national stage, they must balance schoolwork with the ever-increasing demands of football. Only recently did the NCAA make sure these players were adequately fed in the meantime.

This week, hundreds of prospects will reach the long-awaited end of their amateur football journey when they’re selected in the NFL draft. They’ll sign their first pro contracts and ink their first sponsorship deals, finally able to profit off of the developing fame and football ability that got them this far.

But as the draft approaches, I’ve found myself wondering: Why exactly did they have to wait this long to cash in?

“The ascending American football player is really the only athlete in the world that’s in a revenue sport that doesn’t have an early professional option,” says Don Yee, a longtime NFL agent whose client list includes the likes of Tom Brady and Jimmy Garoppolo.

Yee has a plan to change that. Next summer, after years spent ramping up, Yee, along with a group of organizers that includes former NFL coaches, NFL media executives and NFL players, will launch Pacific Pro Football, a start-up football league that plans to function as an alternative path to the NFL. Contrary to the college route, the league would offer young, pro prospects a paid option to pursue their development.

Last month, sitting in a corner booth at the Brookside Golf Course clubhouse in Pasadena, with the iconic Rose Bowl looming in the distance, Yee laid out his plan for a four-team league, based in Southern California, which would focus entirely on preparing football prospects for the NFL. Only ascending young players deemed to have pro potential would be offered contracts. The league would follow NFL rules, with practices wide open to NFL scouts and adhering to NFL rules, all catered towards NFL evaluation.

“Envision the Senior Bowl over a two-month season,” Yee explained.

Prospects whose sole intent is to make the NFL wouldn’t need to masquerade as college students, attending class and trying to make grades, all while many hover just above the poverty line. Instead, Pacific Pro Football plans to pay players an average salary of $50,000 for a two-month season, with room for high-profile players to be offered more. Outside sponsorships and personal branding opportunities will be strongly encouraged – adidas is already signed on as a league partner. For players who are interested, Pacific Pro Football even plans to offer free community college or vocational program tuition.

“Most of these players want to know, ‘How can you get me ready for the NFL?’ ” Yee says. “From a football standpoint, what we’ll have to demonstrate is that if you come play with us, we’ll definitely shorten your learning curve. We’ll help you reduce the risk of failing out of the NFL.”

Yee, who has long been critical of the NCAA, contends that college football is diverging from the NFL in this regard, as differing styles and rules have given rise to a different game. On this point, plenty of NFL talent evaluators agree. At positions like offensive line, where the learning curve is especially steep, development at the college level lags further behind its pro counterpart than ever before. Given a legitimate opportunity, it’s not difficult to imagine top prospects opting for a year of hyper-focused football development over finishing a general studies degree — or pursuing one at all.

Take Trevor Lawrence, for example. If the 20-year-old Clemson quarterback was eligible for the draft this year, he would be the “clear-cut No. 1 pick,” according to ESPN draft expert Mel Kiper. With that in mind, what does Lawrence have to gain from a football perspective from returning to Clemson for two more seasons? What if another option existed?

College players are beginning to seriously consider these alternatives. Every December now, top prospects debate whether or not to play in bowl games. After suffering an injury last fall, defensive end Nick Bosa, a surefire top-three pick in this year’s draft, decided to withdraw from Ohio State to focus on rehab and draft training. How long might it be before a top prospect like Lawrence – or Alabama quarterback Tua Tagovailoa – decides to take his football future into his own hands by sidestepping college football entirely?

Pacific Pro Football isn’t the only league aiming to lure prospects away from the college game. Last month, in an interview with the Southern California News Group, new XFL commissioner Oliver Luck described the NFL’s eligibility rules as “meaningless to us.” He expects the XFL will sign “a handful of guys” who aren’t yet eligible to play in the NFL. Agents contacted by Luck were told top prospects could earn as much as $200,000 per season.

How the XFL – which, unlike Pacific Pro Football, plans to include veteran players – will decide which players are physically and mentally ready for pro football is uncertain. Even Luck admits the league’s decisions on young prospects will be “subjective”.

“We don’t want to put a 19-year-old in the position where he’s not prepared to compete against a 27-, 28-year-old,” Luck said. “But there are some 19-year-olds that could. The 3-year rule comes out of the NFL’s collective bargaining agreement. There’s not a lot of science behind that. It’s just the union bargaining with management.”

In a recent interview with Bleacher Report, star Clemson wideout Justyn Ross was asked if would be tempted to accept such an offer. “Yes and no,” Ross said, before noting that other college football players he knew “would take that money and run.”

The day is rapidly approaching when top prospects will actually have that choice to make. The XFL launches next February and is sure to target young college players next season. Pacific Pro Football plans to kick off next June. Yee believes it would only take one elite player to potentially change the path to the NFL ever.

“I strongly believe that once we secure a prominent player, many will follow,” Yee says. “This part isn’t opinion. It’s really more researching the past.”

It was 94 years ago that Grange made the radical decision to sign with the Bears – a move Grange’s own father criticized in the media. Now, as today’s young stars consider possibly alternative paths to pros, it’s not all that radical to think another superstar is bound to subvert the system, sooner rather than later.

Coachella 2019: El Monte’s The Red Pears talk about playing the festival

Daily News - 2 ore 25 min fa

In just two years, El Monte trio The Red Pears went from playing backyard parties to getting on the bill of one of the most iconic festivals in the United States.

But singer and guitarist Henry Vargas, drummer Jose Corona and bassist Patrick Juarez acknowledged that they not only have never been to Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, it wasn’t even on their list of venues to perform.

  • Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, performs in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Bassist Patrick Juarez, left, drummer Jose Corona and singer Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, perform in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

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  • Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, performs in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • The Red Pears perform in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Drummer Jose Corona, left, and singer Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, perform in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

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“It was something that we thought was too big for us; this is too mainstream,” Corona acknowledged. “Being on a poster that’s going to be on there forever — you’re never going to be left out from this history.”

The trio made their Coachella debut last Saturday at the Sonora tent. They were excited to learn they’d get free water but didn’t even know their trailer was stocked until the second day.

“The first time we performed I was really nervous; it hit me 20 minutes before,” said Vargas, who uttered an expletive as he recounted his emotions. “Playing Coachella you don’t know who’s going to be there and who’s going to see you.”

This second time around, they intend to catch more acts and enjoy the entire experience.

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The Red Pears might not exist today if not for a high school fight, which ultimately connected Vargas and Corona. Vargas had been attending El Monte High School but after a fight transferred to Mountain View High School for his senior year where he ultimately met Corona.

The duo competed against each other in the school’s battle of the bands, and ultimately became friends and band mates.

“I kind of knew what he’s doing, and I knew what to do to make it stand out more,” Corona said, referring to Vargas.

Since they were initially a two-piece, the band’s name is a play on words for the word pair.

“All the two-piece bands have a color like the White Stripes and The Black Keys,” Corona said.

Juarez, who was a fan, joined the band when their former bassist couldn’t travel with them.

Now a trio, they always make sure to tell their audience where they’re from.

“I want to claim where we’re from, even if people discourage it,” Vargas said. “We want to make a different impact.”

“It’s about paying homage to the city that raised you,” Corona said. “You wouldn’t be who you are without this city.”

Michael Norman puts world record on notice at Mt. SAC relays

Daily News - 2 ore 35 min fa
  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

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  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6’ 5” during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike speaks with her father Randell Cunningham after winning the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike makes an attempt at 6’ 6” after winning the high jump with a leap of 6’ 5” during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • A fan looks on during a early morning rain during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Asjah Atkinson of St. AnthonyÕs wins the 100 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Riley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Riley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • durinRiley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Camilo of the Brazilian team wins the 4×100 meter relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Cortney Jones of Florida State wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Jasmine Camacho-Quinn of Nike finished 4th in the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Keni Harrison, right, of Adidas wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Chrishuna Williams of Nike finished fourth in the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sage Hurta (Unattached) wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • An athlete goes down in the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Dillon Hightower of South Hills competes in the 800 Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Curtis Threlkeld, left, of Cal State Bakersfield wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Isaiah Jewett of USC wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Isaiah Jewett of USC wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Teahna Daniels of Texas wins the 100 meter dash Elite as Twanisha Terry of USC finished second and Jenna Prandini of Puma finished third during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Teahna Daniels of Texas wins the 100 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Jenna Prandini of Puma finished third in the 100 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Teahna Daniels of Texas wins the 100 meter dash Elite as Twanisha Terry of USC finished second and Jenna Prandini of Puma finished third during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kenan Christon, right, of Madison wins the 100 meter dash Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Crowd looks on during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Tiffani Marinho of Brazil wins the 400 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Dalilah Muhammed of Nike wins the 400 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kendall Ellis of New Balance finished second in the 400 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Brendon Fong of Maranatha wins the 400 metro dash Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Brendon Fong of Maranatha wins the 400 metro dash Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Gabby Scott of Colorado wins the 400 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kiah Seymour of USATF wins the 400 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Cameron Burrell of Nike wins the 200 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Wataru Inuzuka of the Juntendo University wins the 200 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Paulo Andre Camilo of Brazil wins the 200 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sydney McLaughlin of the Hayes All-Stars runs the first leg as they wins the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Hailey of the Hayes All-Stars runs the second leg as they win the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sydney McLaughlin of the Hayes All-Stars runs the first leg as they wins the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • TORRANCE — As the showdown between Michael Norman, the world’s fastest quarter-miler in 2018, and Rai Benjamin, the second-fastest 400 meter hurdler on the planet last season, in the Mt. SAC Relays 400-meters Saturday grew closer the trash talking between the training partners, already a constant, intensified. “All day long,” Quincy Watts, the pair’s coach, […]

  • Kendall Ellis of the Hayes All-Stars runs the final leg as they win the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Briyahna DesRosiers of Oregon prepares to start the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Athletes shows as they prepare to start the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

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TORRANCE — As the showdown between Michael Norman, the world’s fastest quarter-miler in 2018, and Rai Benjamin, the second-fastest 400 meter hurdler on the planet last season, in the Mt. SAC Relays 400-meters Saturday grew closer the trash talking between the training partners, already a constant, intensified.

“All day long,” Quincy Watts, the pair’s coach, said with a grin.

“The past two weeks I’ve been kind of talking mess with this guy, telling him I’m going to stomp his face in,” Benjamin said post-race standing next Norman, who had not a scratch on him.

Norman had the last word Saturday afternoon, not that there wasn’t still plenty of talk of smashing things.

As in world records.

For the week’s talk, both Benjamin’s good natured smack and the sport’s excited anticipation, Norman made the loudest and most convincing statement with his world leading 43.45 second victory, pulling away from his former USC, now Nike teammate in the final 100 meters at Murdock Stadium on the El Camino College campus.

With Norman knocking .21 off his personal best of 43.61 the world’s fastest mark in 2018, Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa’s world record of 43.03 is officially an endangered species. Norman, at just 21, became the fourth fastest man in history over the 400, equaling 2004 Olympic champion Jeremy Wariner. Norman’s mark was also the sixth fastest in history. Only van Niekerk and Michael Johnson have run faster.

Benjamin’s 44.31 clocking in second—No. 2 on the 2019 world list– did nothing to discourage the growing belief that he is also capable of taking down a world record—Kevin Young’s more than quarter-century old 400 hurdles mark of 46.78.

Benjamin, also 21, equaled two-time Olympic champion Edwin Moses as the second fastest man ever the 400 hurdles with his 47.02 victory at last year’s NCAA Championships. It was the world’s fastest time since Young’s record-shattering victory in the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona and only the second clocking under 47.25 this century, the first since 2005. (Qatar’s Abderrahan Samba ran 46.98 later in 2018.)

“We’ll let track and field decide that,” Watts, himself the 1992 Olympic 400 gold medalist, said when asked what Norman and Benjamin are capable of. “They are an anomaly. They are special and they’re great kids because they’re kids. They’re young. We just have to let the future play out and stay injury free and stay focused and if they stay focused I think these two young men will have a lot of longevity and they can write their names (in the record books).”

Keni Harrison of adidas is already in the record books, taking down the 100 meter hurdles world record in 2016 (12.20). On Saturday, Harrison was neither pleased with her winning time (12.63) or the starter’s quick gun, the latter complaint shared by the rest of the women’s field.

“We weren’t ready,” Harrison said. Nevertheless her clocking was still the fastest in the world this season by .19.

Vashti Cunningham took the high jump with a world leading 6-feet-5½ mark. In the meet’s other much anticipated 400 showdown, Dalilah Muhammed, the 2016 Olympic 400 hurdles champion, held off Kendall Ellis, the hero of USC’s NCAA triumph, 51.62 to 51.72. Both returned for the 4×400 relay, Ellis’ 51.4 anchor securing a 3 minute, 29.88 second victory for Hayes All-Stars that was jump-started by Sydney McLaughlin’s 50.1 lead-off leg.

Yet while Ellis was crossing the finish line the meet was still buzzing about Norman and Benjamin’s race more than hour earlier.

“As hard as they’ve been training I’m not surprised,” said USC head coach Caryl Smith Gilbert, who continues along with Watts to coach the pair as well as Ellis. “I don’t know if they keep training the way they train big things can happen.”

World record big things?

“I hope so,” she said. “That’s the plan.”

The question with Norman isn’t so much if he will break van Niekerk’s world record but by how much and when? Norman’s world record capability was reinforced Saturday not only by his time but the timing.

No one has ever run so fast so early in the season. In fact of the 100 fastest 400s in history only one other mark has come in April, a 43.75 by Johnson in 1997. Norman’s clocking is all the more impressive  given that his training is geared toward the World Championships in Qatar in late September.

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Then there’s the age factor. He’s still two years younger than van Niekerk was when he set the world record at the 2016 Olympics, 12 years younger than Johnson was when he established the previous world record (43.18).

While Benjamin makes his 400 hurdles debut in Shanghai’s Diamond League meet May 18, Norman runs a day later in Osaka. Both will run in a Diamond League meet in Stockholm May 30 and then the Prefontaine Classic at Stanford June 30. One or both could be world record holders by the U.S. Championships in July.

“I felt like today was a good opener,” Norman said. “I was pretty surprised. I didn’t think I was going to open up that fast. But you know I’m really looking forward to these next couple of months.”

He’s not alone.

Photos: Mt. SAC Relays Track and Field Meet Elites

Daily News - 3 ore 55 sec fa

Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California.

  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • SoundThe gallery will resume inseconds
  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6’ 5” during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike speaks with her father Randell Cunningham after winning the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike makes an attempt at 6’ 6” after winning the high jump with a leap of 6’ 5” during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • A fan looks on during a early morning rain during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Asjah Atkinson of St. AnthonyÕs wins the 100 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Riley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Riley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • durinRiley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Camilo of the Brazilian team wins the 4×100 meter relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Cortney Jones of Florida State wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Jasmine Camacho-Quinn of Nike finished 4th in the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Keni Harrison, right, of Adidas wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Chrishuna Williams of Nike finished fourth in the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sage Hurta (Unattached) wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • An athlete goes down in the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Dillon Hightower of South Hills competes in the 800 Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Curtis Threlkeld, left, of Cal State Bakersfield wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Isaiah Jewett of USC wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Isaiah Jewett of USC wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Teahna Daniels of Texas wins the 100 meter dash Elite as Twanisha Terry of USC finished second and Jenna Prandini of Puma finished third during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Teahna Daniels of Texas wins the 100 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Jenna Prandini of Puma finished third in the 100 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Teahna Daniels of Texas wins the 100 meter dash Elite as Twanisha Terry of USC finished second and Jenna Prandini of Puma finished third during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kenan Christon, right, of Madison wins the 100 meter dash Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Crowd looks on during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Tiffani Marinho of Brazil wins the 400 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Dalilah Muhammed of Nike wins the 400 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kendall Ellis of New Balance finished second in the 400 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Brendon Fong of Maranatha wins the 400 metro dash Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Brendon Fong of Maranatha wins the 400 metro dash Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Gabby Scott of Colorado wins the 400 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kiah Seymour of USATF wins the 400 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Cameron Burrell of Nike wins the 200 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Wataru Inuzuka of the Juntendo University wins the 200 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Paulo Andre Camilo of Brazil wins the 200 meter dash Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sydney McLaughlin of the Hayes All-Stars runs the first leg as they wins the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Hailey of the Hayes All-Stars runs the second leg as they win the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sydney McLaughlin of the Hayes All-Stars runs the first leg as they wins the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California.

  • Kendall Ellis of the Hayes All-Stars runs the final leg as they win the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Briyahna DesRosiers of Oregon prepares to start the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Athletes shows as they prepare to start the 4×400 Relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

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Columbine Survivors Reflect, and Reckon With Specter of Future Shootings

NY Times - 3 ore 25 min fa
On the 20th anniversary of the Colorado school shooting, survivors gathered to remember their classmates who were killed. Several said they now worry about their own children.

Valorie Kondos Field’s last dance with UCLA gymnastics ends with 3rd place in NCAA championship

Daily News - 3 ore 43 min fa

FORT WORTH, Texas — For the second straight year, UCLA gymnasts ended a national championship meet with tear-stained faces. Saturday’s weren’t the championship-winning kind.

Instead of defending their national title, the Bruins faltered on their best event, scoring a season-low on floor and finishing third at the NCAA championships in Fort Worth, Texas with a team score of 197.5375.

As the final scores flashed across the screen, with Oklahoma claiming its third NCAA title in four years and LSU finishing second, Valorie Kondos Field huddled her team up. The former ballet dancer whose 29-year head coaching tenure ended Saturday hugged each of her gymnasts and kissed each one on the cheek. She wiped their tears.

She told them thank you. And then they danced.

“That’s what she taught us to,” junior Kyla Ross said, “always live each moment with joy and happiness so that’s how we finished the meet.”

All seven of UCLA’s gymnastics national titles came under Kondos Field’s watch. After a year in which the Bruins became international news, it seemed that they were poised to add another.

However, Oklahoma’s dynasty would not be denied. The Sooners, who had recorded the highest score in the country this year and were the only team to defeat UCLA before Saturday, ran away with the meet with a 198.3375, the second-highest score ever in an NCAA final, trailing their own mark from 2017. Kondos Field was one of the first to congratulate Oklahoma head coach K.J. Kindler after the meet.

Third-ranked LSU finished second with a 197.8250 with first-time finalist Denver finishing fourth with 197.0.

UCLA, the top-ranked floor team in the country, scored a season-low 49.3 on floor, struggling to solidly land tumbling passes. The Bruins lost a combined two-tenths of a point when two gymnasts stepped out of bounds. A 9.95 from Ross and a 9.925 from Katelyn Ohashi on the star senior’s final floor routine could not salvage the rotation.

But even after a disappointing team result, Ohashi gladly signed autographs for fans. She was hoisted onto a ledge so she could reach the young fans who extended their autograph books over the railing toward the 4-foot-11 star.

Behind Ohashi’s viral fame, the Bruins competed in front of record-setting crowds all year. Saturday was no different. The announced attendance of 8,595 in the Fort Worth Convention Center was a record for an NCAA final.

“We can leave tonight with no regrets,” Kondos Field said. “I think it’s been such a great year because they have had so much thrown at them, with me telling them it’s my last year, with Katelyn going viral, with being reigning national champions. The spotlight has been on them every place that we have gone and they have responded with calm, confident, and family.”

The Bruins finished the meet with 49.425s on vault and bars. They tied their second-best vault score of the season, but LSU’s lead for second place still grew after each rotation.

After her bars routine during UCLA’s last event, junior Madison Kocian hugged Kondos Field tightly and told her, “Thank you for everything.” Nia Dennis was upset with herself when she landed short on her dismount and Kondos Field comforted the sophomore as Dennis held back tears. Be proud, Kondos Field said, because your intention was in the right place.

On Sunday, Kondos Field will meet individually with each of the gymnasts in one of her final acts as head coach. She will tell them the special qualities she sees in each of them. She built this program, but she will tell them they’re ready to take over.

“They’re gonna be making history,” Kondos Field said. “And they’re going to set another layer on the foundation of this program, and it starts with them.”

LAFC faces challenge of unbeaten Seattle today at Banc of California Stadium

Daily News - 4 ore 2 min fa

The Los Angeles Football Club nailed down a historic pair of 1-0 wins before the end of April last year.

There was opening day at CenturyLink Field in Seattle that inspired a supporters’ song about the club’s first competitive goal, a stunning shot by Diego Rossi that held up as the game-winner.

And the knuckling free kick by Laurent Ciman that snuck past Sounders goalkeeper Stefan Frei and revealed the stoppage time magic of Banc of California Stadium on its first night, April 29, 2018.

Last year’s results occurred two months apart in the midst of a rare downturn for Seattle as it dealt with injuries and tough midweek matches in CONCACAF Champions League play.

Since going 3-9-3 through four months of the 2018 Major League Soccer season, Seattle has won or tied 23 of its 25 league matches and is unbeaten in its last 11, including a 5-0-1 start this year.

The three longest streaks without a loss in Sounders’ history have occurred since the start of the 2017 season, the first full year Brian Schmetzer served as head coach following eight years as the club’s top assistant.

Seattle’s 16 points in 2019 represent the best start for a club that has earned 10 straight postseason berths — the longest streak in MLS and tied for longest in league history — and over the past decade owns a half-dozen trophies between the MLS Cup, the Supporters’ Shield and the U.S. Open Cup.

As the only remaining unbeaten MLS team this season, Seattle can set a club record by earning points in 14 straight matches if it staves off defeat during three games over the next eight days.

Because schedule makers once again booked a series of Western Conference matches between LAFC and Seattle within two months of the start of the season, the high-octane teams are set to determine that and more on consecutive Sundays to close out April.

The only draw during its current run was a scoreless match at Vancouver, where LAFC (6-1-1, 19 points) lost for the first time after rotating the lineup this week ahead of the Sounders clash — the last of three matches in nine days for Bob Bradley’s side.

While Whitecaps players stayed behind the ball and effectively stifled Carlos Vela, Diego Rossi and the top goal scoring team in MLS on Wednesday, Schmetzer promised that Seattle’s attackers will go after LAFC goalie Tyler Miller and the Black & Gold defense.

“It’s going to be quite interesting and unique,” said Colombian Eddie Segura, who has capably filled Ciman’s old spot at the center of LAFC’s defense alongside Walker Zimmerman. “It’ll feel like a final because of the team that they are and the team that we are.”

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LAFC can stake an early claim to the Supporters’ Shield and home field for the MLS Cup playoffs with a pair of positive outcomes.

The first leg is set for a late afternoon at Banc of California Stadium, where LAFC is a perfect 4-0-0, outscoring opponents 10-3.

Then 364 days after Ciman befuddled Frei, the teams meet for a second time at CenturyLink Field.

“There’s definitely no need to bring that back in our mindset,” Frei said of last year’s losses. “We know where we are now.”

LOS ANGELES FOOTBALL CLUB vs. SEATTLE SOUNDERS FC

Kickoff: 4:20 p.m.; Banc of California Stadium

TV: FS1; FOX Deportes

Radio: 710 AM, 980 AM

Valencia’s Kai Wingo wins 800 at Mt. SAC track and field relays

Daily News - 4 ore 3 min fa
  • Riley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Riley Hunt of Simi Valley wins the 110 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • SoundThe gallery will resume inseconds
  • during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Asjah Atkinson of St. AnthonyÕs wins the 100 meter hurdles invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sage Hurta (Unattached) wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Chrishuna Williams of Nike finished fourth in the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Dillon Hightower of South Hills competes in the 800 Invitational during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Keni Harrison, right, of Adidas wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Keni Harrison of Adidas wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Keni Harrison, right, of Adidas wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Curtis Threlkeld, left, of Cal State Bakersfield wins the 800 meter run Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Keni Harrison of Adidas wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Cortney Jones of Florida State wins the 100 meter hurdles Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Camilo of the Brazilian team wins the 4×100 meter relay Elite during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike speaks with her father Randell Cunningham after winning the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike wins the high jump with a leap of 6’ 5” during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Vashti Cunningham of Nike speaks with her father Randell Cunningham after winning the high jump with a leap of 6Õ 5Ó during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Heat four of the collegiate 100 meter dash during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Friday, April 19, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Michael Norman of Nike wins the Elite 400 meter Dash as teammate Rai Benjamin finishes second during the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College on Saturday, April 20, 2019 in Torrance, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • USC’s Kendall Ellis, left, crosses the finish line first in the women’s 4×400-meter relay next to Purdue’s Jaheya Mitchel at the 2018 NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships at Hayward Field in Eugene, Ore. Ellis will be running at the Mt. SAC Relays on Saturday at El Camino College in Torrance. (Collin Andrew/The Register-Guard via AP)

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TORRANCE — Valencia middle-distance runner Kai Wingo had some unfinished business to take care of on Saturday in the Mt. SAC Relays at El Camino College.

“Last year (El Camino College) was my arch enemy because I hated this stadium,” Wingo said. “I lost my race in the 800, and I couldn’t get to the Masters meet. I wanted to take revenge out on this place.”

He accomplished that and positioned himself as the favorite to for victories at CIF Divisionals and State meet with a sensational effort in winning the 800-meter race. The senior set a new state standard for the season of 1 minute, 52.11 seconds in winning on Saturday. He had the previous standard of 1:52.45 that he set two weeks earlier at the Arcadia Invitational.

“It feels pretty good, but I don’t like being No. 1 because now I have a big target on my back,” said Wingo. “By the end of CIF, I want to be able to hit 1:50.”

Wingo said he will have to develop a change in tactics compared to how Saturday’s race developed.

Ayala’s Andrew Martinez provided an excellent target for Wingo as he established a moderate pace early in the first lap. Wingo took over in the final 300 meters and was well clear of his opposition at the finish.

“I was trying to get out faster, but since (Martinez) passed me, I decided to stay behind him,” Wingo said. “It killed my race, because my first 400 was in 57 (seconds) and I wanted it to be at 55. I have to practice harder to get my time to 55 because I know that there will be a lot of runners shooting for me.”

Wingo’s performance highlighted a solid day for area runners at the meet.

After a disappointing effort at the Arcadia Invitational two weeks ago, Simi Valley’s Riley Hunt improved on his sixth-place effort at last season’s meet to win the 110 invitational hurdles in 14.35 seconds. Last week, Hunt turned in a season-best time of 14.17 seconds at the Ventura County Championships.

“It was one of my best starts of the season,” said Hunt, last year’s Daily News Boys Athlete of the Year. “In between hurdles two and three, I thought was I was going to the floor. It screwed up my next three hurdles that I had to clear.”

With the CIF Divisional and Masters meets coming into focus, Saturday’s race afford Hunt a prime opportunity to run on one of the top surfaces in the country.

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“It gets me really excited,” said Hunt. “I love this track. This is one of my favorite tracks to run on.”

Westlake’s Paige Sommers (13-00) took second place in the girls pole vault with Rancho Bernardo’s Ashley Callahan (13-06) taking the top spot.

On Friday night, Oak Park’s Sarah Shultz won the girls invitational 3,200. A returning sectional champion in the event from last year, Shultz lowered the state mark for the season with a final time of 10:18.77. It is the second meet that Shultz has won this season.

Coachella 2019: How to feel like a VIP with the festival’s sponsored freebies and experiences

Daily News - 4 ore 4 min fa

From a green room-inspired lounge to a hair salon, here’s how Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival attendees can live it up in the middle of the Empire Polo Club in Indio.

Get pampered

At Coachella you’ll inevitably have to deal with either the heat or a wind advisory, which is probably why Pantene created a pop-up salon on the field where both men and women can pick from a small menu of hairstyles. The free hairdos take anywhere from 5-10 minutes, said Barbie Brady, a representative with the production company that helped the haircare line bring the salon to life.

With their ‘do done, they can accessorize their look with biodegradable glitter, feathers or wire twists.

Brady said about 1,800 festival goers walked in for a little pampering last weekend.

Besides the salon, a crew from Pantene visits the showers in the campgrounds to hand out samples as well as “rescue shots” to put on the ends of the hair.

“As I walk around the festival, I know who we touched – that’s our glitter,” Brady said.

The pop-up salon closes at 7 p.m. each night.

House party

One of the most elaborate interactive marketing campaigns at the festival is the My Calvin House, which recreates the suburban Los Angeles home used in its Spring 2019 campaign that features Shawn Mendes, A$AP Rocky and Kendall Jenner.

  • Festival-goers lay on a bed inside a bedroom at my Calvin House during Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. The house is recreation of a suburban Los Angeles home used in Calvin Klein’s Spring 2019 campaign. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

  • Dennell Alvarez, of Fullerton, plays in ball pit bathtub inside inside my Calvin House, an interactive experience, during Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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  • Festival-goers explore the rooftop interactive area inside my Calvin House during Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Watchara Phomicinda, The Press-Enterprise/SCNG)

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It is loosely based on different rooms used in the campaign dubbed “Our Now.”

“We’re really trying to make it feel like you’re not in Coachella anymore, from the linoleum wood floors to the very retro color scheme,” said Kevin Winkle, spokesperson for Calvin Klein.

In the living room, a GoPro captures festival goers and projects their image on one of the three 1970s-era TV screens (the other two feature Mendes modeling).

Guests can step onto the rooftop of the house, which offers the chance to re-imagine those days of sneaking away from one’s parents, but in a very Calvin Klein type of way, says Winkle. The roof tiles feature the iconic CK logo while the LED screen walls loop moments from the fashion line’s campaign and cotton candy skylines.

In nearly every room there’s a chance for the festival goers to capture a photo from a device provided by Calvin Klein and which they can then have sent to themselves. In the bedroom, guests can plop down on the bed or a nearby chair and get a Polaroid taken. They have the option of either keeping the image or posting it on a cork board. If they leave it, attendees are encouraged to leave their social media handle for a chance to be featured on Calvin Klein’s social media campaigns.

“It’s meant to be lived in, they can spend as much time as they’d like,” Winkle said.

The “closet” portion of the house is actually a custom T-shirt station. Every 30 minutes, 10 guests are selected to customize their own Calvin Klein T-shirts – such as putting their own initials – all for free.

Perhaps the most popular feature in the house is the bathroom. The retro style features bright pink walls and baby blue tiles a pink tub full of white plastic balls emblazoned with the CK logo. A crew member is on hand to help the festival goers taking a “bubble bath” capture the moment.

The house is open from noon to 8 p.m.

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Party like the band

American Express cardholders are entitled to some benefits on the festival grounds, but first they have to down the Coachella app. Once on the app, cardholders are asked to input information to unlock some perks such as getting a free ride on the Ferris wheel and monogram embroidery from Lock, Stock and Barrel in the Coachella Boutique.

There’s also the green room-inspired lounge with plush couches and concert posters. Located between Gobi and Mojave tents, the elevated backstage experience gives an Amex cardholder and two guests a chance to escape from the elements.

Once inside, cardholders are treated to either a free sneaker cleaning provided by Jason Markk or nail art through a collaboration with Britney Tokyo, who’s worked with numerous celebrities, including Sunday’s headliner Ariana Grande.

The lounge also has exclusive Grande merchandise for sale.

Before walking out, guests get to take part in a green room tradition: leaving their signature on a white wall.

Christian Yelich homers twice as Brewers snap Dodgers’ winning streak

Daily News - 4 ore 11 min fa

MILWAUKEE — When fans buy a ticket for a game at Miller Park, there’s really only one thing on their minds.

Will Christian Yelich homer before or after the Sausage Race?

He did both Saturday, hitting two home runs — one before and one after the grandaddy of costumed mascot racing — as the Milwaukee Brewers beat the Dodgers 5-0.

The loss snapped a six-game winning streak for the Dodgers.

Yelich leads the majors with 13 home runs — one short of the record for home runs before May 1 shared by Albert Pujols (2006) and Alex Rodriguez (2007). With three more home games this month, Yelich should get there.

All 13 of his home runs (and 29 of his major-league leading 31 RBI) have come in the Brewers’ 13 home games including four in the first three games of this series with the Dodgers. In 87 home games at Miller Park since the Brewers acquired him from the Miami Marlins, Yelich has hit 35 homers (with only 14 on the road).

Yelich hit his first off Dodgers left-hander Hyun-Jin Ryu in the third inning Saturday on a 1-and-2 changeup. The opposite-field drive traveled a modest 386 feet.

In the sixth inning, Yelich was more forceful. He crushed Ryu’s first pitch — a slow curveball that rolled over the heart of the plate with its defenses down — sending it 421 feet into the upper deck above the Dodgers’ bullpen in right field.

Other than that, Ryu was strong in his first start back after spending 11 days on the Injured List with a minor groin injury. He gave up just four hits to the non-Yelich Brewers and struck out nine in 5 2/3 innings, matching his personal-best since returning from shoulder and elbow surgeries.

There was still more Yelich to be dealt with after Ryu left.

In the seventh, Dodgers reliever Caleb Ferguson gave up a two-out double to Lorenzo Cain. Despite having the right-handed Ryan Braun on deck, the strategy was obvious — intentionally walk Yelich and face Braun (a .186 hitter so far this season).

Ferguson did — and then he gave up a three-run home run to Braun.

The Dodgers’ offense never really put up a fight. Joc Pederson led off the game with a single off spot starter Chase Anderson, making his first start of the season for the Brewers. Their next hit didn’t come until the sixth inning off reliever Alex Claudio.

That and five walks were the extent of the Dodgers’ attack.

How to Bounce Back From Rejection

NY Times - 4 ore 13 min fa
When someone rejects you, it helps to remember that there’s another you.

Photos: Every bunny — and dog, cat and reptile — got Archbishop José H. Gomez’s blessing on Holy Saturday

Daily News - 5 ore 10 min fa
  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Maryjane Garcia, 19, holds her parrot Cali after her pet getting blessed by Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez during the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

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  • Diana Zaragoza holds her pet African Bull frog, Frenchie, to be blessed by Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez during the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez blesses a cow as part of the tradition as being the first animal to be blessed as he conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • People wave to Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez before he conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez speaks as he gets ready to conduct the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • People raise their hands to bless the animals as Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • A woman holds her dog as Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • People walk along with their dogs to get their pets blessed as Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dee Lu, holds her dog, Amore, as they react to the holy water and are blessed by Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez during the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Xipe Totec Aztec General, Lazaro Arbizu, holds his dog Tlalli a Xoloitzcuintli Aztec dog breed as Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez conducts the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Diana Zaragoza holds her pet African Bull frog, Frenchie, to be blessed by Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez during the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

  • Dogs walk along after being blessed by Archbishop JosŽ H. Gomez during the 89th annual ÔBlessing of AnimalsÕ at La Placita Olvera in Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Ana P. Garcia, Contributing Photographer)

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Critters of all varieties — dogs, cats, birds, goats, reptiles and, of course, some Easter bunnies — received their blessings on Saturday.

Archbishop José H. Gomez conducted the 89th annual “Blessing of Animals” at historic La Placita Olvera in downtown Los Angeles on Holy Saturday, April 20.

Later that evening, the archbishop was slated to celebrate the Easter Vigil Mass at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels.

“The blessing of the animals is a family event, a time of fun and joy,” said Gomez. “This blessing also reminds us that Easter brings ‘new creation.’ The Resurrection of Jesus gives new life to everything, and a new beginning to everything in God’s beautiful creation – birds, animals, everything that God has made in his love.”

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Coachella 2019: Photos of the performers and their fans from Saturday, Weekend 2

Daily News - 5 ore 12 min fa

It’s the second day of the first weekend at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio and we are trying to soak in as many performances as we can. We’ll be updating throughout the day and into the evening.

  • Drummer Jose Corona, left, and singer Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, perform in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, performs in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

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  • Bassist Patrick Juarez, left, drummer Jose Corona and singer Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, perform in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Henry Vargas, of The Red Pears, performs in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • The Red Pears perform in the Sonora tent during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Ty Segall, of Ty Segall & White Fence, performs during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Tim Presley, of Ty Segall & White Fence, performs during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Shame rolls with fans at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Shame interacts with fans at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Shame interacts with fans at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Shame performs at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Shame performs at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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Check out more of our Coachella photos below:

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Newsom is overplaying his hand in bid to lower drug prices

Daily News - 5 ore 37 min fa

When it comes to prescription drugs, California is a big customer, and big customers should get the best prices, or so the thinking goes.

The state provides health insurance or health care to state employees and to prison inmates, and then there are 13 million people — one third of the state’s population — on Medi-Cal, the safety-net health insurance program for low-income residents.

Gov. Gavin Newsom wants all California state agencies to negotiate as a block to force pharmaceutical companies to lower their prices.

The majority of Medi-Cal patients are currently in a managed health plan, such as LA Care Health Plan, the largest in the state with 2.5 million enrollees. Currently, Medi-Cal managed care plans negotiate their own price agreements with pharmaceutical companies.

But Newsom issued an executive order in January that would “carve out” the pharmacy services benefit from Medi-Cal managed care plans and convert it to fee-for-service, paid for and administered by the state of California.

Would that be less expensive? Newsom hopes so, because health care spending currently absorbs a crushing share of California’s budget. Some Sacramento Democrats want to use the savings on prescription drugs to expand full Medi-Cal coverage to undocumented immigrants up to age 27, or even to all undocumented residents living in California.

Bulk-buying programs are not new. California law already allows the state to negotiate discounts, and other states have created co-operative buying agreements. Judge for yourself how well it’s all working to reduce prescription drug costs.

In 2017, Assemblyman David Chiu, D- San Francisco, introduced Assembly Bill 587, which would have required the Department of General Services to convene the “California Pharmaceutical Collaborative.” This bureaucratic creation would have been co-chaired by the deputy director of the Procurement Division and the assistant secretary of the state’s Health and Human Services Department, and it would have included a representative from each of the relevant bureaucratic agencies plus a couple of political appointees named by the legislative leaders of the majority party.

The collaborative would have been tasked with “coordinating best value clinical treatment protocols” and “leveraging state and local government efficiencies to achieve best value procurement.”

The bill passed in the Assembly but was left to die in the Senate after then-Gov. Jerry Brown let it be known that he wouldn’t sign it.

Gavin Newsom ran for governor with the slogan, “Courage. For a change.” One of his first official acts was this executive order directing state agencies to take over the prescription drug negotiations for more than 13 million Californians.

Perhaps we’re about to find out why “courage” is sometimes another word for “political suicide.”

Negotiating the prices of drugs means the state will have a list of preferred drugs, and anything that’s not on the list won’t be available to people on Medi-Cal or otherwise covered by the state.

That’s pretty much the way it works now for everybody. Managing costs has meant managing availability, making choices to have limited choices.

But the premise of Newsom’s order is that the full force of California’s negotiating power will be able to bring down the price of prescription drugs. His plan calls for eventually allowing private employers to join the cooperative purchasing group. California is a big market, and drug makers won’t want to lose all those customers, right? So they’ll agree to cut their prices, right?

This thinking may turn out to be wildly wrong.

The state can’t really storm out of a negotiation. California provides health care to a lot of people, and it has an obligation to make sure these patients have access to the medications they need. Legalizing grow-your-own only goes so far.

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Prescription drugs are sold at different prices under different negotiated agreements with the federal government, other states and private health plans. Some of these contracts have provisions that tie pricing to what some other entity is paying. If California demands a particular drug at a much lower price, pharmaceutical companies may choose to stop selling that particular drug in California rather than set off a chain reaction of greater discounts across the country.

That’s the point at which a California voter goes to the pharmacy and is told, “Sorry, you can’t have the drug your doctor prescribed, because it’s no longer sold in California.”

And that’s why “courage” is not always a prescription for long-term success in politics.

Susan Shelley is an editorial writer and columnist for the Southern California News Group. Susan@SusanShelley.com. Twitter: @Susan_Shelley.

Coachella 2019: Photos of festival fashion and outfits from Weekend 2

Daily News - 5 ore 47 min fa

The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival is back at the Empire Polo Club in Indio for its 20th year. Our photographers scoured the field for the best, worst and strangest Coachella outfits we saw Weekend 2.

We’ll be updating this gallery throughout the weekend. If you want to see more Coachella photos and stories, visit our Coachella page, follow our magazine on Flipboard or sign up for the Festival Pass newsletter to have updates delivered to you.

  • Ismael “Izzy” Villanueva, of West Covina, shows off his fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Matthew Maguire, of Los Angeles, shows off his fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

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  • Lauren Hardy, of Scottsdale, AZ, shows off her fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Sophie Garcia, of San Francisco, shows off her fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Nathan Munoz, of Redlands, left, and Chelsea Bazilian, of Pomona, show off their fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Hunter Ambrose, of New York, shows off her fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Nathan Munoz, of Redlands, left, and Chelsea Bazilian, of Pomona, show off their fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Jamie Grove, of Toronto, Canada shows off her fashion during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Jennifer Cappuccio Maher, Inland Valley Daily Bulletin/SCNG)

  • Kyla Win of Atlanta sports a crochet look at the Coachella Music Festival in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Jasmine Maciel and Christian Celis of Lancaster created their outfits with material “that screamed Coachella,” they said. They own Crazed Wear, a clothing store that features wild colors. They were at the Coachella Music Festival in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Adrian Godinez, left, and Nathan Throckmorton, both from San Diego, go for an “Egyptian Kings” look at Coachella Music and Arts Festival in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Alecia Baker of Atlanta wears crocheted clothing at the Coachella Music and Arts Festival in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Kyla Win of Atlanta sports a 1970s look at the Coachella Music and Arts Festival in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

  • Alecia Baker and Kyla Win of Atlanta sport some sparkly details at Coachella Music and Arts Festival in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Mindy Schauer, Orange County Register/SCNG)

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Check out our other photos from weekend two of Coachella below:

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As Klay Thompson thrives for Golden State ahead of free agency, his father is a vocal, yet hands-off supporter

Daily News - 5 ore 47 min fa

LOS ANGELES — It’s not that Mychal Thompson doesn’t have a seat. It’s just hard to stay in it.

When he’s attending one of his son’s games, the 64-year-old tends to wander up into the concourse, by the concessions. He’s been through this a lot: Klay Thompson has played in 105 playoff games now, one more than Mychal ever played in, and he’s got one more championship ring, too.

Still, something about the experience frays at Mychal’s nerves.

“I give him his space,” he said. “Let him focus in. I don’t like to sit still.”

That’s been their dynamic for years, Klay Thompson’s dad likes to be hands-off if possible, supportive and worried, but from a distance. And even though Klay, 29, is scheduled to be a free agent this summer and could be chased by the likes of the Lakers, the very team Mychal does radio color commentary for, he fully expects that he still will be cheering from afar next season, and that his five-time All-Star son will remain with the Golden State Warriors.

Make no mistake, Mychal would love for Klay to come home to Southern California — someday after his playing career is over.

“He’ll be happy here, he loves the good weather,” Mychal said. “I always tell him when he’s retired, he’ll have another 40 years to spend here. He’s in no rush to get back.”

The Warriors, who hold a 2-1 series lead over the Clippers, enjoy their visits to Los Angeles particularly because of their roots. Coach Steve Kerr grew up in the area, and general manager Bob Myers attended UCLA.

Even midway through a playoff series, Klay said, “You can always make time for family.”

When Klay comes down to Orange County to visit family, he’s the consummate SoCal outdoorsman: He golfs, not quite with the polish of Steph Curry’s overall game, but boasting 330-foot drives that Mychal called “intimidating.” He also likes to drop shots on the tennis court, catch rays at the beach or roll down the street on a skateboard (nothing too risky, Mychal clarified).

But over the years, Mychal has also seen how Klay has taken to the Bay Area, where he lives with his older brother Mychel and his bulldog Rocco. Mychal will stay with him in his house up in the hills south of Berkeley for a few days at a time to soak in the company. He can see that Klay likes living there, likes playing with his Golden State teammates, likes spreading the floor with Curry.

Mychal finds no suspense in Klay’s free agency this summer. He’s already suggested that his son move to the other side of the bay to better access the Chase Center, the new Warriors’ arena which will open next season. Mychal’s own allegiance to the Lakers doesn’t really enter the equation. Even on nights like when Klay scored 44 points against the Lakers in three quarters in January, Mychal doesn’t dream about him lighting up Staples Center for the home team.

That doesn’t mean he doesn’t get bugged around his neighborhood, where strangers approach him in the grocery store or at the coffee shop and ask if Klay is coming back to Los Angeles to team up with LeBron James and lead the franchise back into the postseason.

“I can’t go anywhere,” Mychal said. “Ultimately it’s a compliment: Lakers fans want him to play here. But I don’t think that way. I think the Lakers are gonna be fine. I don’t see Klay coming out here as a savior.”

Mychal has never been shy about having high bars for his kids, including Mychel who played professionally in the G League and Trayce, who plays pro baseball. It’s common for him to critique, somewhat tongue-in-cheek, Klay’s big games and add that he should have made more shots. He also expects Klay to win at least six championships to his two rings he won with the Lakers, otherwise, “they will have underachieved.”

But on many of Klay’s basketball decisions, Mychal prefers to let his son go his own way. He deferred to Klay’s coaches growing up, as he became a razor-sharp shooter at Santa Margarita Catholic (a 6-foot-10 forward, Mychal made just one 3-pointer in his NBA career). When Klay was 18, Mychal saw how committed he was to playing in the then-Pac-10, and when he chose Washington State — a school that had little basketball history to speak of to that point — he supported the decision.

Klay does things his way, which not every son of a longtime NBA pro can claim.

“He’s been real good about that,” Klay said. “Just always let me choose my own destiny while supporting me. He’s been a great dad.”

During Game 2 against the Clippers, Mychal was supporting Klay from his couch: After a season of traveling with the Lakers, he prefers to take a break from the rigors of frequent plane travel. His jangly nerves had subsided in the third quarter when the Warriors had amassed a 31-point lead.

Whoops.

“I was sitting there stunned,” Mychal said. “I was pretty frustrated after Game 2.”

The follow-up effort in Game 3 appeared to soothe him at least for a while. He’s anticipating another championship run, and he knows the Warriors have the talent to do it. His suggestion from afar for Kerr: Play the starters 40 minutes, because “tomorrow you can rest” — it’s the only “back in my day” bit Mychal would share.

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But that’s all the advice Mychal has for anyone on the Warriors. He trusts Klay to make the right decision this summer, and in all likelihood that won’t involve the Lakers. Mychal thinks the Lakers will be back in the postseason anyway, which could his two allegiances on a crash course.

Ever a diplomat, Mychal doesn’t really buy into the conflict.

“If the Warriors have to lose, I hope it’s the Lakers: I could live with that,” he quipped. “I always cheer for him to do well. As long as he plays well I’m happy.”

Alex Verdugo’s production has been strong for Dodgers despite limited playing time

Daily News - 6 ore 2 min fa

MILWAUKEE — The Dodgers have a hitter who is 10 for 26 (.385) with runners on base, 6 for 12 (.500) with runners in scoring position and 5 for 8 (.625) when there are two outs and a runner in scoring position.

“Wow,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said when read those numbers. “Who is that hitter?”

It is Alex Verdugo who ranks sixth on the team in RBI while ranking 10th in plate appearances. Nine of Verdugo’s 13 RBI have come with two outs in an inning.

“Yeah, I mean I knew I was hitting pretty well with runners on. But obviously that’s doing a pretty good job at a pretty good clip,” Verdugo said when asked if those numbers surprised him. “That’s where you want to be at. I try not to think about the numbers, just go out there day by day and have my at bats. Control what I can control.

“Once you start pressing and worrying about it, you wind up putting a little more pressure on yourself and you’ll find yourself going downhill.”

Verdugo said his hitting approach in run-scoring situations is more a “natural” part of his approach to hitting than it is something thought out and calculated. Anyone familiar with Verdugo’s personality finds nothing surprising about that.

“Alex is very positive, a youthful-enthusiasm guy,” Roberts said. “The league is going to adjust and he’s got to continue to adjust with them. But that energy, the bat-to-ball (skill) is real.”

When Verdugo made the season-opening roster, it was difficult to see where his playing time was going to be found and Roberts has started him just nine times in the first 23 games of the season.

“I will say the way he’s playing, when he is playing the way he impacts our ballclub … to try to find opportunities certainly that is the case,” Roberts said this week. “Keeping him relevant, keeping him going, the momentum, giving guys days off to use our whole roster — I think it’s a real good thing for all of us.”

BACK TALK

Catcher Russell Martin has increased his workouts the past two days. He did blocking drills and took batting practice on the field with the team Saturday and is scheduled to catch a bullpen session on Sunday.

He could be ready to go on a rehab assignment next week — though he doesn’t want to.

“We’ll continue to have those discussions,” Roberts said.

Martin has been out since April 10 with lower back inflammation.

WEATHER OR NOT

Another reluctant rehabber, left-hander Rich Hill, is scheduled to pitch somewhere on Monday. But the Dodgers are not saying where yet.

Roberts held out the possibility that Hill could make that second rehab start at the Dodgers’ training complex in Arizona, pitching to players in the extended spring training camp.

“The weather doesn’t look too promising in either Double-A or Triple-A,” Roberts said. “So now to get those innings, to build up, Arizona makes sense.”

Roberts called that “a good possibility” at this point. The Dodgers want Hill to extend his pitch count to six innings and about 90 pitches before he joins the rotation. Hill threw 54 pitches in four scoreless innings for Class-A Rancho Cucamonga on Wednesday.

POWER OUT

Through Friday, the Dodgers had hit a National League-leading 41 home runs. Twelve different players have contributed to that total including one pitcher, Walker Buehler.

Justin Turner has not.

But that shouldn’t be surprising. In 441 career plate appearances before May 1 (through Friday), Turner has hit only two home runs — one on April 27, 2015 (off Yusmeiro Petit of the Giants) and April 29, 2017 (off Hector Neris of the Phillies).

“It was brought to my attention that he doesn’t homer, typically, in April,” Roberts said. “But it’s sort of worked out well the past five years so I’m not too concerned about Justin. As long as he’s taking good at-bats which he does, gets on base, drives in runs. The homers will come.”

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The Dodgers activated left-hander Hyun-Jin Ryu from the Injured List for Saturday’s game. Reliever Josh Sborz was sent back to Triple-A to clear a roster spot. Sborz did not get in a game during his first week in the big leagues.

UP NEXT

Dodgers (LHP Clayton Kershaw, 0-0, 2.57 ERA) at Brewers (RHP Brandon Woodruff, 2-1, 5.23 ERA), 11:10 a.m., SportsNet LA (where available), MLB Network (out of market only), AM 570

Trashed at Coachella 2019: We rank these artist-designed recycling bins at the festival

Daily News - 6 ore 7 min fa

By now, Trashed: Art of Recycling has become an expected attraction at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.

Part of the Global Inheritance programs that are meant to inspire people to care about the environment, the art display is made up of dozens of recycling bins redesigned by several artists. The artists transform them in all sorts of ways, from whimsical works of art to exact replicas of everyday objects like coffee cups and boxes.

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They attract a lot of attention and are constantly photographed. And yes, you can throw plastic bottles, cartons and cans in there to be recycled, because these are functioning works of art.

And so with that in mind, we ranked our favorite bins at this year’s Coachella.

Cup of Grande

She has a name that sounds like a drink at Starbucks, and so artist Art 1 stepped up and just put the two together when he created his Ariana Grande Starbucks cup out of a recycling bin. It has her picture in the middle of a Starbucks logo and even her lipstick stain at the top. Though it’s more on of a venti than grande in size.

A recycling bin designed by Art 1 features a drawing of Ariana Grande in a Starbucks logo and is shaped like a coffee cup. It is on display during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer) Cat in a box

Cats are irresistible on the internet and it turns out cats are just as adorable when they’re trying to get you to recycle. This bin by artist b.yarza perfectly recreates a cardboard box, and if that wasn’t cool enough there’s a cute gray kitty sticking its head out the top of the box. Just pull back the head and deposit your bottles and cans.

A recycling bin designed by artist b.yarza features a cat emerging from a box and is on display during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer) Coach-chella

Artist Jim Shook calls his pink fairy-tale-inspired carriage Coach-Chella. Get it? See because a carriage is also called a coach. Either way, it’s pink, has gold wheels and a gold top and it’s every princess’ dream.

A recycling bin designed by artist Jim Shook resembles a princess carriage and is on display during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer) Girl power

The Powerpuff girls are superheroes who regularly save their town from evildoers, and now at Coachella they’re here to save the environment. This bin by artist Dart is painted in bright pink with anime-style images of the Powerpuff girls all around.

Related links More cats

If you live with a cat, you’ll feel right at home when you see this bin created by artist Nicole Lipp. It has old family pictures attached as well as mirrors on all sides so you can check yourself out, and best of all there’s a cat resting on top. It’s a realistic-looking cat, so some people are a little thrown off at first wondering how a cat can sleep through Coachella.

A recycling bin designed by the artist Nicole Lipp features an artificial cat and is on display during the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival at the Empire Polo Club in Indio on Saturday, April 20, 2019. (Photo by Drew A. Kelley, Contributing Photographer) Related Articles Out of this world

You can’t escape good recycling habits, not even in space. Artist Carly Ealey went with a space theme for her bin and painted stars, galaxies as well as three dimensional geometric shapes that stick out of the sides of the bin. They resemble colorful spikes which gives this bin a tough out of this world look.