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Rust scores in shootout, Penguins beat Kings

Daily News - 2 ore 15 min fa

PITTSBURGH — Bryan Rust has helped carry the Pittsburgh Penguins with Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin out of the lineup.

Rust scored twice in regulation and got the lone goal in the shootout, and the Penguins beat the Los Angeles Kings 5-4 on Saturday night.

“That’s just a character win,” Rust said. “We obviously have a lot of guys out. We were down by two and then up by two and they tied it up again. It was a bit of a roller-coaster game.”

Rust came through again when the Penguins needed him most.

He faked a shot on the forehand and flipped a blocker-side backhander past Kings goaltender Jonathan Quick for the deciding goal. The Kings had a chance to continue the shootout, but the puck rolled off Adrian Kempe’s stick, giving the injury-riddled Penguins their fifth win in six games.

Rust, who scored the overtime winner Thursday against Columbus, had a 5-on-3 power-play goal in the second period. Teddy Blueger and Jack Johnson scored third-period goals, while Jake Guentzel and Kris Letang both had three assists. Pittsburgh has points in 17 of its last 22 games, including 13 wins.

Tristan Jarry, who entered the game with three shutouts in his last four appearances, made 38 saves for Pittsburgh.

Tyler Toffoli, Michael Amadio, Kyle Clifford and Austin Wagner scored for the Kings, who have lost six of their last nine. Quick stopped 23 shots.

“I didn’t think we were sharp in a couple situations offensively where we could’ve finished, but for the most part it was a pretty honest effort from the guys,” Kings coach Todd McLellan said.

Pittsburgh rallied from an early two-goal deficit in the first period, and then blew a two-goal lead in the third. Five of the last eight games between the Penguins and Kings have needed overtime.

Blueger put Pittsburgh ahead 3-2 at 9:26 of the third period. Johnson gave Pittsburgh a two-goal lead 29 seconds after Jarry stopped Anze Kopitar on a breakaway, and then a penalty shot.

But the Kings tied the game with two late goals.

Clifford converted a rebound with 5 minutes left and Amadio scored 1:23 later after a net-mouth scramble in front of Jarry.

“I thought our reaction to (the comeback) was great,” Penguins coach Mike Sullivan said. “We didn’t get rattled and we didn’t get on our heels. We just kept playing the game.”Related Articles

The Penguins played their second straight game without three of their top four centers.

Malkin skated on his own Saturday morning, but he missed his second straight game with an illness. He’s one goal from becoming the fourth in franchise history and eighth active in the NHL to score 400 goals. Crosby and center Nick Bjugstad have been out since November because of core muscle surgery. Pittsburgh is also without top defenseman Brian Dumoulin and forward Patric Hornqvist, who both missed their sixth straight games with lower-body injuries.

The Penguins have won 16 of their last 22 in the regular season without Crosby and Malkin, including eight of the last 10 at home.

“Our guys are playing hard and competing,” Sullivan said. “We’re fighting hard. I just like our effort.”

The Kings are in a stretch in which they play 12 of 16 games on the road, including their current season-long six-game trip.

Los Angeles won its second straight overall and ended an 11-game road winless streak with a win at Anaheim on Thursday. Before Thursday, the Kings were 0-10-1 on the road since a win against Winnipeg on Oct. 22.

Los Angeles plays 11 road games among its 15 total this month. The Kings haven’t won back-to-back road games since beating Anaheim and Calgary in March.

“For us to come into this building where they play exceptionally well as a team, and to push a goaltender that’s as hot as anybody in the league to a shootout … we’ll take it,” McLellan said.

UP NEXT

Kings: Continue their trip Sunday at Detroit.

UFC 245: Amanda Nunes dominates Germaine de Randamie to retain title

Daily News - 2 ore 40 min fa

LAS VEGAS — Amanda Nunes has never had such a dominant performance in which she’s had to work so hard.

The only double champion in UFC history took the fight against Germaine de Randamie where she had a decisive advantage – to the ground – and came away with the unanimous-decision victory in their bantamweight title fight at UFC 245 on Saturday night at T-Mobile Arena.

The judges scored it 49-44, 49-46, 49-45 for Nunes (19-4), who now has won 10 in a row. Her 12 wins are the most in UFC women’s history.

“Honestly, I was a little bit off tonight, but I’m the champ, I always have Plan A, B, C and more,” Nunes said. “If something goes wrong with the first plan, I just go to the next one. This is exactly what we trained for, so I’m happy.”

The Brazilian phenom finished with eight takedowns against the Dutch kickboxer, who didn’t allow too much damage despite spending so much of the fight on her back. It was the most takedowns landed in a women’s UFC title fight, surpassing the six scored by Ronda Rousey against Miesha Tate at UFC 168.

Nunes, 31, let de Randamie (9-4) taste her power in the first round, then took the challenger down and set the tone for the fight with some strong ground and pound in easily the most lopsided round of the fight.

The second round was clearly de Randamie’s best as she appeared to wobble Nunes with punches and knees against the Octagon.

Nunes looked stunned by an upkick in the third. And in the fourth, de Randamie, from her back and with Nunes on top of her, was able to get her legs up in an attempted triangle choke. That left Nunes’ arm exposed, which de Randamie isolated and seemed close to securing for a potential armbar submission, only to have Nunes slip out.

The fight was a rematch from 2013, when Nunes used a similar game plan to defeated de Randamie via TKO by taking her down and punishing her with punches and elbows.

The loss snapped a five-fight winning streak for de Randamie, 35, who defeated Holly Holm via a hotly contested decision to win the first UFC women’s featherweight championship in 2017.

In other fights at UFC 245:

No. 1 bantamweight Marlon Moraes (23-6-1) d. former featherweight champion Jose Aldo (28-6), in his 135-pound debut, via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 29-28)

No. 4 bantamweight Petr Yan (14-1) d. Urijah Faber (35-11) via KO (head kick) at 0:43 of the third round.

Welterweight Geoff Neal (13-2) d. Mike Perry (13-6) via TKO (headkick/strikes) at 1:30 of the first round, becoming the first fighter to knock out Perry.

No. 10 bantamweight Irene Aldana (12-5) d. No. 2 Ketlen Vieira (10-1) via KO (punches) at 4:51 of the first round.

No. 14 middleweight Omari Akhmedov (20-4-1) d. No. 10 Ian Heinisch (13-3) via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28).

Welterweight Matt Brown (24-16) d. Ben Saunders (22-13-2) via KO (ground and pound) at 4:55 of the second round.

Featherweight Chase Hooper (7-0-1), only 20 and in his UFC debut, d. Daniel Teymur (7-4) via TKO (ground and pound) at 4:34 of the first round.

No. 5 flyweight Brandon Moreno (15-5-1) d. No. 6 Kai Kara France (20-8, 1 NC) via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 30-27).

No. 2 flyweight Jessica Eye (15-7-1, 1 NC) d. No. 6 Viviane Arujo (8-2) via unanimous decision (29-28, 29-28, 29-28) in a catchweight fight after Eye missed weighed at 131 pounds (Eye was fined 30% of her purse).

Middleweight Punahele Soriano (7-0) d. Oskar Piechota (11-3-1) via KO (strikes) at 3:17 of the first round.

Two horses die in first race at Los Alamitos

Daily News - 2 ore 48 min fa

LOS ALAMITOS  >> Two horses died after the first race at Los Alamitos Race Course today, adding to the death toll in a year that has seen increased scrutiny of the sport in Southern California.

According to official Los Alamitos racing results, Mighty Elijah — a 4-year-old gelding — “weakened between horses in the lane, was injured and pulled up inside the furlong marker and was vanned off,” while Into a Hot Spot — a 4-year-old bay gelding — “broke out and bumped a rival at the start, was hustled along early, fell back into the turn, gave way and collapsed after being unsaddled.”

A Los Alamitos official confirmed the deaths this evening.

Mighty Elijah was trained by Jerry Hollendorfer, the 73-year-old Hall of Fame trainer who has had at least eight horses die in his care in 2019. Hollendorfer was banned from Santa Anita racetrack in Arcadia and also from Del Mar Thoroughbred Club, but a judge granted an injunction in July that allowed him to continue doing business at the San Diego-area track.Horse racing has been under the microscope since 37 horses died at Santa Anita racetrack in Arcadia during the most recently concluded racing season.

The California Horse Racing Board is conducting an investigation into the rash of racehorse deaths at Santa Anita, and the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office is also conducting a criminal investigation into the deaths.

Many animal rights groups have called for a statewide ban on the sport.

Track workers and industry supporters, meanwhile, have said shutting down the industry in California would lead to thousands of job losses.

Related Articles

Pacoima Christmas Parade pleases a crowd looking for tradition

Daily News - 2 ore 48 min fa

The 52nd annual Pacoima Christmas Parade stepped off on Saturday from Pacoima Neighborhood City Hall.

  • Parade participants move along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Parade participants move along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

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  • Parade participants move along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Parade participants move along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Santa and Miss Claus wave to parade-goers on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Parade participants move along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Parade participants move along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Congressman Tony Cárdenas waves to parade-goers on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Actors Danny Trejo, center, and Gabriel Pimentel, join Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez, Congressman Tony Cárdenas, right, and other dignitaries on Van Nuys Boulevard to start the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Santa and Miss Claus wave to parade-goers on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Ethan Herrera, 3, runs to greet Santa on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Actors Danny Trejo, center, and Gabriel Pimentel, left, join Councilwoman Monica Rodriguez, second from the right, and other dignitaries on Van Nuys Boulevard to start the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • The LAPD Motorcycle Drill Team moves along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Parade-goers wave to Santa and Miss Claus on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Actor Danny Trejo, right, wave to parade-goers on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

  • Parade participants move along on Van Nuys Boulevard during the 52nd Annual Pacoima Holiday Parade in Pacoima on Saturday, Dec 14, 2019. (Photo by Ed Crisostomo, Contributing Photographer)

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The “Childhood Memories and Wishes Beyond” theme parade proceeded on Van Nuys Boulevard (at the corner of Oneida Avenue) to Herrick Avenue with bands, including Arleta High School and San Fernando High School, classic cars, equestrians, church and school organizations and members of Pacoima Beautiful and the Pacoima Neighborhhood Council.

Grand marshal Congressman Tony Cárdenas and other elected officials including Los Angeles City Councilmember Monica Rodriguez were all set to take part. The parade-watchers cheered and waved as Santa and Mrs. Claus made their appearance.

“It’s the longest running parade in the San Fernando Valley,” said John Hernandez from Pacoima Chamber of Commerce. “It brings the community together and the streets are packed.”

The event was sponsored by the Pacoima Chamber of Commerce. www.facebook.com/pacoimaholidayparade

LaVine scores 31 points, Bulls rally to beat Clippers

Daily News - 2 ore 59 min fa
  • Los Angeles Clippers players react as they watch teammates during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Chicago Bulls Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls guard Denzel Valentine, left, shoots against Los Angeles Clippers forward/center Montrezl Harrell during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

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  • Chicago Bulls guard Tomas Satoransky, center, looks to the basket against Los Angeles Clippers guard Derrick Walton Jr., left, and forward/center Montrezl Harrell during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Los Angeles Clippers forward/center Montrezl Harrell, second from left, shoots against Chicago Bulls guard Kris Dunn, left, guard Denzel Valentine, second from right, and center Wendell Carter Jr., during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls head coach Jim Boylen, second from right, talks to his team during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Los Angeles Clippers Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls forward Kris Dunn, left, and Los Angeles Clippers guard Rodney McGruder battle for a rebound during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls forward Kris Dunn, left, guards Los Angeles Clippers forward Paul George during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls guard Zach LaVine, right, drives to the basket against Los Angeles Clippers guard Landry Shamet during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Los Angeles Clippers guard Terence Mann, right, drives to the basket as Chicago Bulls guard Tomas Satoransky defends during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Los Angeles Clippers head coach Doc Rivers reacts as he watches his team during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Chicago Bulls Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls forward Kris Dunn reacts after guard Zach LaVine scored the game- winning score against the Los Angeles Clippers during the second half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. The Bulls won 109-106. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Los Angeles Clippers forward Paul George, left, and Chicago Bulls forward Kris Dunn battle for a loose ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Los Angeles Clippers guard Landry Shamet, right, shoots over Chicago Bulls forward Kris Dunn during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls forward Lauri Markkanen, right, drives against Los Angeles Clippers center Ivica Zubac during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

  • Chicago Bulls forward Lauri Markkanen, right, drives against Los Angeles Clippers center Ivica Zubac during the first half of an NBA basketball game Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

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CHICAGO — Zach LaVine scored 31 points and converted a decisive three-point play in the Chicago Bulls’ 109-106 victory over the short-handed and weary Los Angeles Clippers on Saturday night.

Chicago trailed by five points with less than two minutes to go. Tied at 106, the Bulls inbounded with 5.4 seconds left. LaVine got the ball near the 3-point line, drove to his right and was fouled by Montrezl Harrell as he scored with 2 seconds left.

Paul George then missed a 3-pointer at the buzzer.

Lauri Markkanen had 13 points and 17 rebounds, Thaddeus Young scored 17 points, and Denzel Valentine had 16 for the Bulls.

Harrell had 30 points and George had 27 for Los Angeles. The Clippers had won four in a row.

Besides playing for the third time in four days at the end of a six-game trip, the Clippers were without Kawhi Leonard (injury management, left knee soreness), Lou Williams (right calf), Patrick Beverly (concussion) and JaMychal Green (tailbone contusion).

This was the eighth game Leonard has missed. He scored 42 points Friday night at Minnesota.

Los Angeles led by 15 points midway through the second quarter before Chicago closed the first half with a 19-6 run to pull to 57-55.

The Bulls continued the surge early in the third, scoring 17 straight points for a 75-61 lead. The 75 points were two more than Chicago scored Friday night in an 83-73 home loss to Charlotte.

The Clippers answered with a 12-1 run to trim the deficit to 76-73 and pulled to 81-79 in the final minute of the third on a three-point play by Harrell. LaVine then hit a 3-pointer to give Chicago an 84-79 lead entering the fourth.

Los Angeles jumped back on top, 95-93, on a layup by Landry Shamet with 5 1/2 minutes left. LaVine answered with a 3-pointer to give Chicago a 96-95 edge. LaVine was fouled on the shot by Jerome Robinson, but missed the free throw.

A couple of minutes later, George hit a pair of free throws to break a tie at 98 and Shamet hit a 3-pointer for a 103-98 Clippers lead with 2½ minutes remaining. LaVine and Valentine hit 3-pointers on back-to-back possessions — sandwiched around one of two free throws by George — for a tie at 106 with 47.9 seconds left.Related Articles

TIP-INS

Clippers guard Shamet returned after missing a month (17 games) with a high right ankle sprain. He finished with 11 points in 21 minutes.

Bulls forward and Mission Viejo alumnus Chandler Hutchison (right shoulder sprain) missed his ninth straight game. He hasn’t been cleared for contact and there is no timetable for his return. “He shot earlier today, he got some three balls up, so that was encouraging,” coach Jim Boylen said.

QUICK TURNAROUND

The start of Friday night’s game at Minnesota was pushed back nearly two hours to accommodate national TV, so the Clippers had less recovery time than a typical back-to-back.

“Our league has been great, but today’s game, in my opinion, should not be played or happen,” coach Doc Rivers said. “When you play basically an 8:45 p.m. game and then have to fly and get to your hotel at 3:45 and go to bed at 5, you probably shouldn’t be playing basketball the next day — especially if they’re talking about our health.”

UP NEXT

Clippers: Host Phoenix on Tuesday night.

UCLA gymnastics showcases new era with “Operation Peacock” in exhibition meet

Daily News - 3 ore 56 sec fa
  • Macy Toronto performs a floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Macy Toronto performs a floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

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  • Head coach Chris Waller during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Pauline Tratz performs the floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Norah Flatley performs on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Macy Toronjo performs on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Former gymnast Katelyn Ohashi during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sara Taubman hugs a coach after performing on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Gracie Kramer performs the floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Madison Kocian performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Pauline Tratz performs the floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller speaks with Felicia Hano during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kids have fun during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kids look on during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Gymnasts are announced during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kyla Ross performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kyla Ross performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Grace Glenn performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Samantha Skati performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Norah Flatley performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kyla Ross performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Madison Kocian performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Margzetta Frazier performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Nia Dennis performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Margzetta Frazier performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Margzetta Frazier performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Coach Kristina Comforte during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Margzetta Frazier, right, smiles after performing on the on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sara Taubman performs on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Nia Dennis performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kyla Ross performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Nia Dennis performs on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Nia Dennis, left, with teammate Felicia Hano prepares to perform on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kalyan???s Steele performs on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kendal Poston during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Nia Dennis, left, hugs teammate Mercedez Sanchez after performing on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Felicia Hano performs on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Felicia Hano performs on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Felicia Hano performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Felicia Hano prepares for her floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kyla Ross performs the floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Gymnasts wait to enter the court during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller speaks with Madison Kocian during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Felicia Hano performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Nia Dennis, left, hugs teammate Mercedez Sanchez after performing on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kids have fun during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Gymnasts are announced during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Madison Kocian performs the floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Madison Kocian performs the floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Mercedez Sanchez performs on the Uneven Parlalel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Margzetta Frazier performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller with Nia Dennis during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Foot prints in chalk during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Sara Taubman hugs a coach after performing on the Uneven Parallel Bars during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Kyla Ross enters for her floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller, right, with coach Kristina Comforte during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller speaks with Felicia Hano during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Head coach Chris Waller during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Madison Kocian performs on the balance beam during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

  • Felicia Hano performs the floor routine during the Meet The Bruins gymnastics exhibition in Pauley Pavilion on the campus of UCLA on Saturday, December 14, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)

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LOS ANGELES — UCLA head coach Chris Waller couldn’t stop smiling.

He walked into the stands to greet parents and friends and stopped by the UCLA student band to introduce himself before the meet started.

It was UCLA Gymnastics’ annual “Meet the Bruins” exhibition, and it would be the first time Waller would be introduced not as the Bruins’ assistant coach, but instead as the team’s head coach.

“It was interesting, but some ways just so familiar since this is my 18th season being here,” he said about his head coaching debut. “So some ways really familiar, but ultimately, just honestly, really rewarding and fun.”

Waller, who wore a navy-blue velvet blazer with a gold tie, debuted the No. 4-ranked 2020 Bruins’ gymnastics team in the intrasquad-style exhibition meet to a crowd of 1,313 fans at Pauley Pavilion Saturday evening.

Besides the numerous alumni that were present, including viral sensation Katelyn Ohashi, the meet was highlighted by what Waller dubbed as “Operation Peacock” — a flashy, fun spin to the Bruins’ floor routine just for the purpose of Saturday’s meet.

Introduced by a video of Waller’s Riddler-themed high bar routine in the 1996 Reese’s International Gymnastics Cup, the coach explained that Operation Peacock was created to help athletes feel more connected to the characters they portray in their floor routines.

I hope Chris Waller opens up Meet the Bruins just like this. pic.twitter.com/9PSSkszsq3

— Pamchenkova (@Pamchenkova) December 9, 2019

Gymnasts wore personally designed leotards which matched their routine’s music and choreography. They walked out from a backdrop curtain and onto a catwalk-like carpet as they approached the mat.

“It was grown out of the idea of trying to get these guys to bust out of their shell and become performers,” Waller said. “To help them connect with their character because their floor routine through the choreography and the music, it tells a story … We just thought it would be really fun and why not?”

Strike up the band for Nia Nation! @DennisNia is ready for #OperationPeacock#MeetTheBruins pic.twitter.com/9WRYpB0d0V

— UCLA Gymnastics (@uclagymnastics) December 15, 2019

Junior Nia Dennis designed a blue and black leotard with gold cuffs and white collar to match her routine’s theme of “Battle of the Bands.” The back of her leotard read “Nation” in nod to her longtime gymnastics personal slogan of “Nia Nation.” She finished Saturday’s exhibition with an all-around score of 39.475.

“I have a lot of family in New Orleans and every year we go to Battle of the Bands,” she said. “They have a lot of extra dancing and are super dramatic. After I picked my music, I was really able to design my leotard because I could really just do exactly what they wear.”Related Articles

Senior Felicia Hano will be competing in all four apparatuses this season for the first time in her collegiate career. She finished Saturday’s meet with an all-around score of 39 after missing the final landing in her floor routine.

“It was really good,” she said. “I’m a little disappointed at the end, I got a little ahead of myself. But I think overall it went really really fine, and today was a really good tester for the rest of the season. I know that I can do it for the rest of the season now, so I’m excited.”

After opening the meet by singing the national anthem, sophomore Margzetta Frazier led the all-around finishers with a final score of 39.575. Kyla Ross finished last of the all-around competitors with a score of 38.35. The senior struggled with the uneven bars, using three attempts to complete a handstand on the higher bar.

UCLA is ranked No. 4 in the preseason rankings by the Women’s Collegiate Gymnastics Association. Outside of the Bruins, two other Pac-12 teams are ranked in the Top-10 with Utah ranked at No. 5 and California at No. 9. Oregon State follows at No. 11.

The Bruins officially open their season on Jan. 4 at the Collegiate Challenge in Anaheim where they will face No. 1 Oklahoma, California and Stanford at 6:30 p.m. UCLA’s first home meet will be on Sunday, Jan. 12, at 3 p.m. vs Boise State.

LSU’s Joe Burrow wins the 2019 Heisman Trophy in a record-breaking landslide

Daily News - 3 ore 19 min fa
  • LSU’s Joe Burrow, left, is announced as this year’s Heisman Trophy winner during the Heisman Trophy Award Show, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. Also seated are fellow finalists, from left, Ohio State quarterback Justin Fields, Oklahoma quarterback Jalen Hurts and Ohio State defensive end Chase Young. (Todd Van Emst/Pool Photo via AP)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow, left, hugs his mother, Robin, after he is announced as the Heisman Trophy winner, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. Burrow’s father, Jim, is at right. (Todd Van Emst/Pool Photo via AP)

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  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow, left, hugs his coach Ed Orgeron after he is announced as the Heisman Trophy winner, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (Todd Van Emst/Pool Photo via AP)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow poses for a photo after winning the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019 in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow poses for a photo after winning the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow, right, and head coach Ed Orgeron pose for a photo after Burrow wins the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow reacts while speaking after being awarded the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (Todd Van Emst/Pool Photo via AP)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow poses for a photo after winning the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow poses for a photo after winning the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019 in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow poses for a photo after winning the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow reacts while speaking after being awarded the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (Todd Van Emst/Pool Photo via AP)

  • NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow talks to the media during a news conference after winning the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • NCAA college football player and Heisman Trophy finalist, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow listens to questions from the media during a news conference before the Heisman Trophy ceremony, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

  • LSU coach Ed Orgeron, right, congratulates NCAA college football player, LSU quarterback Joe Burrow after they posed for a photo with the Heisman Trophy, Saturday, Dec. 14, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Jason Szenes)

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NEW YORK (AP) — Born into a family of Cornhuskers and raised in the Buckeye state, Joe Burrow left his roots behind and became a Heisman Trophy winner at LSU.

The quarterback won the Heisman on Saturday night in a record-breaking landslide, becoming the first LSU player to bring college football’s most prestigious award back to Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 60 years.

Burrow received 2,608 points and 841 first-place votes, a record 90.7% of all the first-place votes available. Burrow also set a record for percentage of points available received with 93.8, breaking the mark of 91.6% set by Troy Smith of Ohio State in 2006. Burrow was named on 95.5% of all ballots, breaking the record of 95.2% set by Oregon’s Marcus Mariota in 2014.

Burrow’s margin of victory of 1,846 broke the record of 1,750 set by O.J. Simpson of Southern California in 1968.

Oklahoma quarterback Jalen Hurts was second with 762 points. Quarterback Justin Fields of Ohio State was third and defensive end Chase Young of Ohio State was fourth. .

Burrow transferred last year to LSU from Ohio State, where he was a sparingly used reserve. After finishing strong for the Tigers in 2018, he broke out this season, setting a Southeastern Conference record with 48 touchdown passes and leading top-ranked LSU (13-0) to its first College Football Playoff appearance.

Burrow’s victory was a foregone conclusion, but after he was announced as the winner it still overwhelmed him.

“That’s the most I’ve cried in 23 years of living,” Burrow said later.Related Articles

After hugging his parents and coaches, Burrow made his way to the stage inside the PlayStation Theater in Times Square. He started his acceptance speech, stopped and took 23 seconds to compose himself before rattling off the names of LSU’s other offensive players.

“All my teammates have supported me, welcomed me with open arms. Kid from Ohio, come down to the Bayou, and welcomed me as brothers,” Burrow said, with about two dozen former Heisman winners standing behind him on stage.

“What a special moment,” LSU coach Ed Orgeron said. “I thought Joe handled everything first class. It’s the first time I’ve seen him get that emotional.”

The Tigers will face No. 4 Oklahoma and Hurts on Dec. 28 at the Peach Bowl in Atlanta.

“I’m ready to get back to Baton Rouge and start practice on Monday,” Burrow said.

Burrow, a senior, blended perfectly with first-year LSU passing game coordinator Joe Brady and produced the most prolific offense in school history. Playing in a version of the offense Drew Brees runs for the New Orleans Saints, Burrow has shown accuracy and quick decision-making similar to his childhood idol. With at least one game left, Burrow has passed for 4,715 yards and is completing 77.9% percent of his passes, on pace to set an NCAA record.

The kid who grew up thinking he might play college basketball has blossomed into the possible first overall pick in April’s NFL draft, and LSU’s second Heisman winner.

Halfback Billy Cannon won the Heisman for LSU in 1959. The 60-year gap between Heisman victories for LSU is the largest for any school with multiple winners.

Burrow is the 17th quarterback to win the Heisman since 2000, and the third straight QB to win the award after transferring, joining Oklahoma’s Baker Mayfield (2017) and Kyler Murray (2018).

Burrow’s dad, Jimmy Burrow, was a longtime college football coach, who played at Nebraska. He spent the last 14 years of his career as defensive coordinator at the Ohio University in Athens before retiring to spend his weekends watching his son play.

“It’s been a dream season for him as well,” Burrow said.

Joe Burrow grew up in The Plains, Ohio. His older brothers both played at Nebraska.

His father’s old boss, Ohio coach Frank Solich, hoped the youngest Burrow boy would play for the Bobcats, but Joe took off in high school. Burrow was Mr. Football in Ohio in 2014 and signed with Ohio State the next year.

In Columbus, Ohio, Burrow joined an already loaded quarterback room with J.T. Barrett, Cardale Jones and Braxton Miller. Burrow redshirted as a freshman and played a little in 2016.

In 2017, he was competing with Dwayne Haskins to be Barrett’s backup and broke his hand in preseason practice. That opened the door for Haskins to position himself as the quarterback of the future for Ohio State.

After spring practice in 2018, having already graduated from Ohio State, Burrow decided to transfer. LSU wasn’t his first choice, but Orgeron recruited the quarterback hard.

“He gave me an opportunity when not a lot of people thought I was going to do anything,” Burrow said. “He trusted me with his program.”

Burrow was interested in Nebraska, but that interest wasn’t reciprocated. Cincinnati seemed like a possibility, playing for former Ohio State assistant coach Luke Fickell.

A visit to LSU, with its 100,000-seat stadium, history of winning, southern hospitality and SEC competition, won over Burrow. Orgeron has called Burrow his most important recruit and maybe the most important recruit in the history of LSU football.

That might have sounded like hyperbole a few months ago.

Not anymore.

“It’s been a long and winding (journey),” Burrow said, “and there’s still more chapters to be written.”

Ducks getting out of town a day early to avoid unexpected travel delays

Daily News - 4 ore 6 min fa

ANAHEIM — Their first flight of the season was late leaving and late arriving, and it messed up the Ducks’ timing when they hit the road for the first time back in October. They were scheduled to arrive in Detroit at a reasonable hour, get a good night’s sleep and prepare for their game against the Red Wings.

Instead, a lengthy flight delay nearly cost them a victory. The Ducks were forced to rebound from a poor start — in hindsight perhaps their worst of the season — to defeat the Red Wings 3-1 in an Oct. 8 game that gave them a 3-0-0 record to start the season.

Taking no chances of a repeat, and with an extra day built into the schedule, Ducks coach Dallas Eakins decided the team should leave Sunday rather than Monday for the start of a four-game trip Tuesday in Philadelphia. The Ducks will practice Monday in Philly and prepare for the Flyers.

Sunday will be devoted to traveling from coast to coast.

“You just don’t know what’s going to happen,” Eakins said.

Above all, the Ducks did not wish to have a repeat of their Detroit journey.

“There was a hiccup with the plane and we sat on the tarmac for an extra two or three hours,” Eakins said. “We got in late and now you’re scrambling. It’s like, ‘Whoa, these guys are in a different time zone.’ Our morning skate is at 11:30. That’s 8:30 our time. Everything’s messed up.”

The drawback is leaving town a day early with family and friends arriving in Southern California for Christmas celebrations. But before the holiday break, the Ducks have one more business trip to make and that’s exactly how they’re going to treat it.

“We’re business first,” Eakins said. “We’re going to leave, get a day in and make sure we get a good practice in and, hopefully, it sets up for a better start. That first period in that Detroit game, we were upside down. For me, it had nothing to do with being prepared. It had everything to do with our time clocks.”Related Articles

YOUTH MOVEMENT

Eakins shuffled his lines for Saturday’s game against the New York Rangers, moving Devin Shore and Ondrej Kase onto a line with Ryan Getzlaf, reuniting Rickard Rakell, Adam Henrique and Jakob Silfverberg and skating youngsters Max Comtois, Sam Steel and Troy Terry together.

The kids were better than all right, according to Eakins. Although they were scoreless in the Ducks’ 4-3 shootout victory over New York, Steel and Terry were each credited with three shots on goal and Comtois with one as the Ducks posted a season high 42 shots.

“The thought process was easy,” Eakins said. “When you’re searching to score goals, and win games, it’s important to go back and look at the past. We went back to the start of the season and we started fairly well, and we started looking at old combinations that were good.

“They fight for each other. They play for each other. They like the challenge of it.”

CARRICK REASSIGNED

The Ducks returned center Sam Carrick to their AHL team, the San Diego Gulls. Carrick had one assist in two games after he was recalled from San Diego on Dec. 7. He was the Gulls’ leading scorer with 10 goals and 16 points in 18 games when he was summoned from San Diego.

LeBron James watches Bronny James lift Sierra Canyon to victory with career-high night

Daily News - 4 ore 14 min fa

COLUMBUS, Ohio >> St. Vincent-St. Mary would score and the 14,000 on hand would erupt in cheers. Sierra Canyon’s Bronny James would touch the ball and the same electric crowd would take a collective deep breath in anticipation of what the young freshman would do next.

You could hear it and feel it.

Bronny’s father, LeBron James, sat courtside watching the drama unfold as his son delivered a story-book ending to a magical night at Nationwide Arena Saturday night.

What a moment for LeBron James. Sees Bronny score a career high (15 points), get awarded MVP, and get the go-ahead steal and layup late in the game to help lift Sierra Canyon to a 59-56 win over LeBron’s alma mater St. Vincent-St. Mary. pic.twitter.com/Qu8WwgF4J0

— Tarek Fattal (@Tarek_Fattal) December 15, 2019

Bronny stole an inbound pass at half court and drove for a layup with 39 seconds to give Sierra Canyon a one-point lead and the eventual 59-56 victory. LeBron watched the rest of the game on his feet he was so excited. It didn’t matter that his son drove the dagger through his alma mater St. Vincent-St. Mary, the moment was too awesome.

“I think I was a lot more nervous than my son coming in here,” LeBron told ESPN’s Rachel Nichols during a halftime interview on ESPN3. “It’s been such a surreal moment for myself, our family and Bronny himself.

“It’s full circle that I’m here in my home state, my son is here with his high school playing my alma mater.”

Bronny poured in a career-high 15 points and was named game MVP. After taking a photo at center court, he was embraced by his father. It was a heart-warming moment, especially because it was LeBron’s first time watching Bronny in a regular game this season.

Bronny James named MVP of the game. Well deserved. pic.twitter.com/JBSEl0I3dD

— Tarek Fattal (@Tarek_Fattal) December 15, 2019

More to come on this story..

She’s 16 and Wants to Be President: Meet the Teenagers Planning Their Campaigns

NY Times - 4 ore 32 min fa
Research shows that Generation Z is the first in which women are more likely than their male peers to be engaged in politics. Here’s what some of them told us.

Armenian-Americans, leaders, gather in Glendale to celebrate U.S. recognition of Armenian Genocide

Daily News - 4 ore 43 min fa

A crowd of about 200 people packed the Glendale Central Library’s auditorium on Saturday for a celebration that even a week ago might not have been predictable.

But, when the political winds blow in a certain way and world events come together, sometimes a long-fought struggle can lead to a win. And that’s what happened on Thursday, when the U.S. Senate unanimously approved a resolution recognizing the Armenian Genocide, the mass killing of 1.5 million Armenians beginning from 1915 to 1923 at the hands of the Ottoman-Turks. Despite major pushback and lobbying from the modern-day Turkish government, the senators joined their counterparts in the House of Representatives (who approved an identical bill in October).

“(The resolution) was a culmination of a lot of hard work … a long struggle against the odds,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Burbank, principal co-author on the House bill.

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For years Schiff has tried to bring similar legislation to the House floor, sometimes getting really close, but also being rebuffed by political forces that on this issue have prompted Democratic and Republican lawmakers and presidents to shy away from calling the history a genocide.

But observers say recent events, including Turkey’s recent invasion of Syria, where once American ally the Kurds were attacked, helped shape a new political dynamic. With that, even allies of President Trump were willing to defy him and swiftly (and surprisingly) consent to the resolution. And with these independent resolutions not vulnerable to Trump’s veto pen, incredulous advocates in Glendale were touting the maneuver.

“The most recent resolutions, H.Res 296 and S.Res 150, differ (from past resolutions) in that they were standalone resolutions, meaning neither requires the approval of the other house or the president,” said Alex Galitsky, a spokesperson for the Armenian National Committee of America Western Region. “This is recognition by the House and the Senate in their own right. These initiatives have been spearheaded by the Armenian-American coalition and our allies in Congress.”

For years, Armenians in Glendale and across L.A. have pushed not only Congress, but the Turkish government, to recognize the genocide. They’ve marched. They’ve erected memorials, and they’ve told the stories of their ancestors, lost to what they and scholars say was the deportation and slaughter of 1.5 million of ethnic Armenians from the Ottoman Empire.

  • Congressman Adam Schiff enters a town hall meeting to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • Congress members Adam Schiff (right) and Judy chu attend a town hall meeting to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • SoundThe gallery will resume inseconds
  • Congress member Adam Schiff addresses a town hall meeting, also attended by congress member Judy Chu (not pictured) to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • A protestor disrupts a town hall meeting attended by congress members Adam Schiff and Judy Chu to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • A President Trump supporter disrupts a town hall meeting attended by congress members Adam Schiff and Judy Chu to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • A protestor (center) is escorted out of a town hall meeting by Glendale Police after disrupting a speech by congressman Adam Schiff as he discussed the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • A President Trump supporter holds up a flag during during a town hall meeting that included congress members Adam Schiff and Judy Chu to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • Congress member Adam Schiff addresses a town hall meeting, also attended by congress member Judy Chu (not pictured) to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • Congress member Judy Chu addresses a town hall meeting to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • Congress member Judy Chu enters a town hall meeting to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • Congress members Adam Schiff and Judy Chu before entering a town hall meeting to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • Congressman Adam Schiff during a town hall meeting to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

  • The Armenian National Committee of America Western Region hosted a town hall meeting with congress members Adam Schiff and Judy Chu to discuss the recent passage of a resolution to recognize the Armenian genocide, at Glendale Central Library on Dec. 14, 2019. The resolution, which was passed by the Senate on December 12, is the first formal recognition by Congress of the 1915 mass killings Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as a genocide. (Photo by Trevor Stamp, Contributing Photographer)

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A press release issued on Friday by the Republic of Turkey’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs called the move by the United States a “disgraceful example” that politicizes history and that it was “devoid of historical awareness.” It also stated the resolution was damaging efforts and interrupting the endeavors to develop Turkish-U.S. relations. Turkey is a NATO member, and has been a key ally during wars such as in Iraq, providing key routes for American forces. President Trump has forged a good relationship with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, despite concerns over what critics say are Erdogan’s authoritarian tendencies and the existence of a Trump Towers in Instanbul. Turkey summoned the U.S. ambassador in Ankara over the Senate’s recognition and the Turkish parliament on Friday condemned the State’s adoption of the genocide recognition bill. And Erdogan, once again, threatened repercussions should the U.S. officially embrace the word “genocide.”

But that embrace is what happened Saturday in Glendale, where the crowd greeted Schiff and Rep. Judy Chu, D-Pasadena, with a standing ovation.

Despite the goodwill, the event took a turn for about 20 minutes when protestors disrupted Schiff by shouting profanities and getting into tussles with some of the audience members as they pushed and shoved each other to get their messages across.

The arguments appeared to be between those in attendance and Trump supporters carrying “No to Impeachment” signs and a Trump flag. Schiff has been a leading figure in efforts to  mpeach the president over the past few months, drawing the ire of Trump and his supporters.

Glendale police officers were called and some of the audience members left and did not return to the 2-hour presentation.

There were no arrests made, according to police.

Upon calming down the audience inside the library earlier and restarting the program, Chu said the recently passed resolutions put the genocide issue on the right side of history.

“This is a day to celebrate … a day to commemorate… around this country finally doing the right thing,” Chu said.

Granada Hills Charter’s Sofia Abrego helps L.A. City Section take a step forward at Foot Locker Nationals

Daily News - 4 ore 46 min fa

SAN DIEGO >> It won’t show up in the final result, of course, but Saturday brought a learning lesson to Sofia Abrego and some history for the City Section.

Abrego, a Granada Hills Charter sophomore, finished 33rd of 40 on Saturday in the 5-kilometer event at Balboa Park’s Morley Field in the 41st Foot Locker National Championships, finishing in 18 minutes, 45.7 seconds.

Most in the girls race said the start was quicker than anticipated, thus rendering the two hills tougher than usual. Abrego was no exception.

“It was faster than I thought it was going to be,” Abrego said. “I knew it was going to be fast. I don’t know – I think I went out too fast and underestimated the hills.”

She was just the fourth City Section girl to qualify for the Foot Locker final — the West Region race was last week at Mt. SAC — following San Pedro’s Valerie Flores in 1999, North Hollywood’s Natalie Stein in 2000 and Palisades’ Marissa Williams in 2012.

“Definitely, I’m so happy I get to represent the City Section,” Abrego said, “and I hope I get to do it again.”

The area’s other individual who competed Saturday was Village Christian junior Mia Barnett, who was 39th in 19:32.4 after winning the West Regional last week.

“I just wasn’t feeling that great today, and I think that could be from a long season,” Barnett said, “so I think I just know for next time to prepare more of this exact race.”

Saturday’s Foot Locker national champions were Zofia Dudek of Ann Arbor (Mich.) Pioneer, who won the girls race in 16:45.0, and Josh Methner of John Hersey High School in Mount Prospect, Ill., who won in 15:08.8.

 

Rams vs. Cowboys: This Dallas episode comes with a plot twist

Daily News - 5 ore 21 min fa

ARLINGTON, Texas — At first it was all Cowboys. Lately it’s all Rams. Whoever is on top in the half-century-old rivalry between two of pro football’s glamour teams, there’s almost always a lot on the line.

When the Rams and Cowboys collide at AT&T Stadium on the outskirts of Dallas late Sunday afternoon, it’s a big game again, but with a twist.

This time they’re fighting not for supremacy but for survival.

It’s a meeting of two teams trying to prove they’re better than their won-lost records and worthy of scraping into the playoffs. The Rams are 8-5, coming off their best back-to-back games of the season, one game behind the Minnesota Vikings with three weeks to go in the race for the NFC’s final playoff spot. The Cowboys are 6-7, losers of four of their last five but clinging to first place in the NFC East by virtue of a tie-breaker with the Philadelphia Eagles.

“Everyone’s better than their record,” Rams running back Todd Gurley said during the week, not pausing to let mathematicians and philosophers ponder this theory before he moved on to discussing the plights of these particular teams.

“They’re just not in a good place right now,” Gurley said of the Cowboys. “But they’re in a better place than us because they’re going to make the playoffs (if they win the rest of their games).”

Rams safety Eric Weddle agreed that the Rams face a harder climb than the Cowboys despite their better record. The Rams will have a great chance to get a wildcard playoff berth only if they win the rest of their games to finish at 11-5, although they still could sneak in by losing one and finishing 10-6 if the Vikings lose two of their last three. The Vikings face the Chargers Sunday in Carson, then close the season with home games against Green Bay and Chicago. For whatever it’s worth, they lost to the Packers and Bears in September.

“It’s all or nothing,” Weddle said. “They (the Cowboys) have a lot riding on it too, but in the grand scheme of things, all they have to do is beat Philly next week and they’re good. We can’t lose, where we are in the NFC.

“We’re trying to build on what we’ve done the last coupe of weeks, keep our momentum, keep playing good team ball, keep communicating, leave it all out there.”

None of today’s Rams and Cowboys players were alive when Dallas dominated these teams’ series, winning the 1975 and 1978 NFC championship games behind Roger Staubach, Tony Dorsett and stubborn defense.

Most current Rams do remember their wins over the Cowboys in the fourth week of the 2017 regular season and the first round of the 2018 playoffs.

The 2017 game, on the road, coming from behind to win 35-30, with Gurley taking a Jared Goff pass and exploding for a 53-touchdown to put the Rams in front, was the first big win for then-rookie coach Sean McVay.

“I just remember thinking, ‘Wow, it was like he was shot out of a cannon,’ ” McVay said of Gurley this week. “You talk about a signature play.”

The Rams and Cowboys have split their 34 meetings 17-17, the Rams winning 12 of 25 in the regular season and 5 of 9 in the playoffs.

This time, it’s both a drama and a mystery, Rams fans wondering why their team took so long to get rolling in the season after its Super Bowl trip and Cowboys fans wondering if theirs ever will.

The Cowboys are under .500 despite outscoring opponents by 5.2 points a game, leading the NFL in total yards and ranking ninth in yards allowed, leading the league in passing yards with quarterback Dak Prescott and top receiver Amari Cooper, and having Ezekiel Elliott to hand the ball to.

Since Elliott came out of Ohio State in 2016, he leads the NFL in yards from scrimmage (6,656). Gurley is second in the same period (6,026).

“When he’s (Elliott) rolling, and everything’s clicking, they’re tough to stop, and their ranking shows it, no doubt about that,” Rams linebacker Clay Matthews said. “Obviously the narrative around them hasn’t been one of a lot of hope, but when you look at them on film, they’re a powerful offense, and we’re going to have our hands full.

“I’ve been a part of a few of those (underachieving) teams as well. Fault and blame can be divvied out a little bit everywhere, whether you want to say it’s coaching to accountability to finishing games.

“But that’s not really our job to worry about that for them, because obviously they’ve got just as much to battle for as we do. Despite the record, we expect to face the best Cowboys team.”

It sounds like what other teams said before games against the Rams for most of the season, before the defense held five of the last six opponents under 20 points and the offense awakened to beat the Arizona Cardinals 34-7 and Seattle Seahawks 28-12.

Like the Rams, who would be in playoff position right now if a game-winning field goal hadn’t missed by inches against the Seahawks in October, the Cowboys can blame their disappointing record on close losses to the Vikings, New Orleans Saints and New England Patriots.

That and poor kicking, too few big plays on defense and too many penalties on offense.

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“Well, obviously we haven’t played consistently well enough throughout the year,” said Cowboys coach Jason Garrett, whose job is thought to be in jeopardy, although owner Jerry Jones said he won’t be fired during the season. “We’ve got a good group of guys who work hard and compete the right way. Unfortunately, we’ve had a couple different stretches where we haven’t played well enough.

“It’s really about a bunch of guys who need to lock in what on we need to do each day to go play our best football against the Rams this week.”

McVay returned the compliment, despite the Cowboys’ record.

“I know this, what you see on tape is a very good football team,” McVay said. “We’ve got to be ready to go.”

This all could lead to another showdown between the two teams in the playoffs, but first both have to get there.

Joe Burrow Wins the 2019 Heisman Trophy

NY Times - 6 ore 5 min fa
Three of the four Heisman finalists, including Louisiana State’s Burrow, transferred to their current teams from other schools.

Fire Breaks Out at New Texas Rangers Stadium

NY Times - 6 ore 43 min fa
The blaze was quickly contained and there were no injuries reported, a fire official said.

Lakers say LeBron James (elbow) questionable for Sunday’s game in Atlanta

Daily News - 6 ore 48 min fa

ATLANTA — A collision with Jimmy Butler in the last four seconds of Friday’s win against the Heat could cost LeBron James.

The Lakers (23-3) said the 34-year-old star was questionable for Sunday’s game against the Atlanta Hawks (6-20) with a sore right elbow, tumbling to the floor after Butler blew up James’ attempt to take a charge on the final shot of the game.

James had cold packs strapped to his elbow in the visiting locker room after the 113-110 win, and at one point, he was bleeding.

“I mean it’s fine,” he said at the time. “I’m icing it right now. We’ll see what happens.”

The Lakers also announced that Kyle Kuzma would miss his third straight game while recovering from a left ankle sprain that has now been bothering him for two weeks.

James has yet to miss a game this season. He’s started all 26 games so far, averaging 25.9 points and a league-leading 10.8 assists per game. While his rim-finishing and rebounding has slipped slightly from last season, he’s become a 36 percent 3-point shooter in a more complimentary role to new star Anthony Davis.

James has been the trump card for one of the best starts in franchise history. The Lakers have outscored opponents by a team-high 248 points this season when James is on the floor. When he’s out, the Lakers have only outscored opponents by a single point. After a recent game, Vogel suggested that’s still something the Lakers are working on.

“That’s a part that we definitely need to continue to grow, and we haven’t been as strong thus far, so far in the season,” he said. “The lineups with LeBron out and (Rajon) Rondo in have really started and begun to pick up.”

Thrown into the mix is a complication of schedule: James flew to Columbus over the weekend with plans of watching his 15-year-old son Bronny James play for Sierra Canyon. It’s the first time that the four-time MVP has been able to watch the game live, playing against St. Vincent-St. Mary, his Akron-based alma mater. He planned to rejoin the Lakers in Atlanta in time for tip-off.

The final play has already been a source of controversy. The NBA released a last two minute report on Saturday afternoon indicating that the Heat were disadvantaged by two missed calls: when James took the hit from Butler on an inbounds play, arriving too late to take a charge; then again when Davis contested Butler’s last shot and had his feet in Butler’s landing space. The Lakers contended that Butler intentionally kicked out to draw contact — only to no avail as the shot missed the mark and no whistle blew.

Even after the game, Danny Green took a relatively even-keeled view, saying he had braced for the possibility of whistles on both plays.

“Wasn’t sure if they were going to call it or not because of the way they both (James and Butler) kind of sold it,” Green said. “Jimmy still got the ball and got a pretty good look. Obviously AD, defensive player of the year, very alert, got a contest … It was close. Jimmy had his legs out there and I wasn’t sure if they were going to call a foul or not, but I think the whole crowd was waiting to see if they were gonna review it. But got a good contest and made Jimmy miss.”

James rarely misses games with long-term injuries, but a groin tear last winter with the Lakers turned out to be the longest period he ever sat out with injury since his NBA career began.

Live updates: Bronny James, Sierra Canyon basketball defeat St. Vincent-St. Mary

Daily News - 7 ore 3 min fa

Bronny James and Sierra Canyon boys basketball play St. Vincent-St. Mary, the alma mater of Lakers’ LeBron James, in the Nationwide Arena in Columbus, Ohio.

LeBron left Miami early on Saturday for a side trip to Ohio, so he can watch tonight’s game.

Reporter Tarek Fattal is in Columbus with live updates.

Trump Tells Army-Navy Athletes Relaxed Rules Could Help Them Go Pro

NY Times - 7 ore 35 min fa
A Department of Defense memo issued last month allows athletes who play for military academies to seek to delay their service obligations if they pursue professional sports.

‘Afghan papers’ confirm critics’ worst fears about war

Daily News - 7 ore 39 min fa

SACRAMENTO – It’s been 18 years since the United States invaded Afghanistan in what officials promised to be a decisive mission to uproot a breeding ground for Islamic fundamentalist terrorism. You’re totally not shocked to learn that things didn’t quite work out as promised, and that the government repeatedly misled the public about its level of success, about the fundamental purpose of the endeavor and just about everything.

Like I said, you’re not surprised. That’s how government behaves – not that many readers believed anti-war libertarians as we warned about such things at the time. I’m surprised it took so long for anyone to notice, and that the latest evidence – a meticulously reported project by the Washington Post – has been met with yawns. It’s hard to compete for attention with the ongoing impeachment proceedings, but the “Afghan Papers” should cause heads to roll (or explode).

We’ve all devolved into members of bickering high-school cliques who snipe at each other on social media and don’t trust any information from others, but there are worse things. I recall the morning my wife called me into the TV room to watch the burning World Trade Center. “Uh, I think I better get to the newspaper right away,” I said. For years after those attacks, Americans seemed united as we trusted the government to wage its war on terrorism. A little bit more bickering and distrust might have been a good thing.

On the Orange County Register editorial board, we issued our warnings about overseas commitments – the costs in lives and treasure and the impossibility of turning impoverished backwaters into modern democracies. We were accused of basically being bad Americans. Yet the Afghan and Iraq conflicts turned out pretty much as we and other critics predicted, as the Post report reveals in maddening detail.

Most people have long realized that Iraq was a debacle. It was a war of choice that had little to do with the 9/11 attacks, but Afghanistan seemed more defensible given that the Taliban and Islamic fundamentalists clearly had set up shop there. But the Post report suggests that even that reality didn’t make the war’s focus clear. The newspaper combed through thousands of pages of documents and hundreds of interviews gleaned through public-records requests.

The newspaper found “that as the war dragged on, the goals and mission kept changing and a lack of faith in the U.S. strategy took root” at the highest levels. Officials couldn’t even agree on the purpose of the war: some wanted to turn the nation into a democracy, others wanted to “transform Afghan culture and elevate women’s rights” and “still others wanted to reshape the regional balance of power among Pakistan, India, Iran and Russia.” They failed on all counts.

The arrogance of American officials always amazed me. Our country’s large-scale efforts to transform parts of this country – the War on Poverty, the Great Society – failed spectacularly. Yet our leaders thought they could invade a country that most Americans couldn’t pinpoint on a map, and which had a history of repelling invaders (think of Russia), and fundamentally transform its society. And they kept spinning Americans and distorting “statistics to make it appear the United States was winning the war when that was not the case.” The government probably figured Americans wouldn’t ask many questions when it came to “national security.”

Some of the Post’s stories were eye-opening: how military officials were ordered to spend millions of dollars a day in small regions, even though no one had any idea what to do with it. That’s government. It literally dumps money on problems and hopes it will create progress, when all it does is encourage corruption. Even more amazing, our military couldn’t distinguish between friends and enemies.

My favorite quotation was from an unnamed adviser to an Army Special Forces team: “They thought I was going to come to them with a map to show them where the good guys and bad guys live. It took several conversations for them to understand that I did not have that information in my hands. At first, they just kept asking: ‘But who are the bad guys, where are they?’”

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These days, we’re all sure our fellow partisans are brilliant and the other side is evil, but this ought to give everyone pause: President Barack Obama’s policy in Afghanistan wasn’t appreciably different from George W. Bush’s – and neither of them had any particular success. Both made grandiose promises about “winning” and eradicating terrorists, but neither delivered.

In 2009, the geopolitical website Stratfor.com noted that “radical Islamist groups are pursuing a strategy of exhaustion where success is not measured in the number of battles won, but rather the ability to outlast the occupier.” Frankly, I’m exhausted by a government that continues to squander lives and treasure in pursuit of pointless wars – and by Americans who refuse to recognize it until it’s too late.

Steven Greenhut is Western region director for the R Street Institute and a member of the Southern California News Group editorial board. Write to him at [email protected] 

Statue unveiled at the Rose Bowl honoring legendary broadcaster Keith Jackson

Daily News - 7 ore 40 min fa

PASADENA — The late sportscaster Keith Jackson, who dubbed the Rose Bowl the “Granddaddy of Them All,” was remembered Saturday with the unveiling of a statue outside the legendary Pasadena venue.

Today was an incredible moment in our stadium history and an honor to unveil a statue of the legendary Keith Jackson with his family and friends! We are thankful to everyone who made this possible and look forward to the years of inspiration Keith’s memory will continue to bring! pic.twitter.com/Cdhg3AtCqd

— Rose Bowl Stadium (@RoseBowlStadium) December 14, 2019

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  • A statue of the legendary broadcaster Keith Jackson was unveiled at the Rose Bowl Stadium on Saturday with his family and friends. (Photo courtesy Rose Bowl Stadium)

  • A statue of the legendary broadcaster Keith Jackson was unveiled at the Rose Bowl Stadium on Saturday with his family and friends. (Photo courtesy Rose Bowl Stadium)

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  • A statue of the legendary broadcaster Keith Jackson was unveiled at the Rose Bowl Stadium on Saturday with his family and friends. (Photo courtesy Rose Bowl Stadium)

  • A statue of the legendary broadcaster Keith Jackson was unveiled at the Rose Bowl Stadium on Saturday with his family and friends. Shown center is 2020 Tournament of Roses President Laura Farber. (Photo courtesy Rose Bowl Stadium)

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Jackson, who died Jan. 12, 2018, at age 89, called the Rose Bowl Game a record 15 times and was selected for the game’s Hall of Fame in 1999. The Rose Bowl stadium’s broadcast center was renamed in his honor in 2015.

His statue, depicting Jackson standing and holding a microphone with the Rose Bowl logo, will be located in the Rose Plaza near the stadium’s south entrance. It will be the third statue at the stadium. The other statues are of Jackie Robinson, dedicated in 2017, and Brandi Chastain, dedicated in July in honor of the U.S. Women’s National Team that won the World Cup at the Rose Bowl in 1999.

The Rose Bowl Legacy Foundation, which raised funds for the statue, called Jackson “a symbol of togetherness and inspiration for sports fans across the globe.”

Jackson retired in 2006 after 40 years with ABC.